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Robert E. Call and Jack W. Jenkins

Mating disruption of codling moth using codlemone pheromoneemitting twist-ties or cards has become a standard practice in many orchards. This study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of NoMate CM EC, a spray formulation of codlemone pheromone. Treatments were applied 20–21 Apr. 1995 to plots measuring 99 × 244 m of 15-year-old `Golden Delicious' apple trees on seedling rootstock. Trees were spaced 3.7 × 5.5 m and treatments were made in a randomized complete block design replicated three times. Whole trees were sprayed to run-off using a handgun. Treatments were 20.2 g a.i. NoMate CM EC/h and a watered sprayed control. Two pheromonebaited, sticky traps were placed in each replicate to monitor codling moth activity. Moth counts were made 3 days after treatment and continued twice weekly for 4 weeks. Results indicated very little moth activity for the first 14 days of the study in plots treated with NoMate CM EC when compared to the control. However, after the first two weeks differences between treatments were not significant.

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J.D. Hansen, M.A. Watkins, M.L. Heidt, and P.A. Anderson

. Cold storage is already used against the apple maggot [ Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae)] ( Hallman, 2004 ) and the oriental fruit moth [ Cydia molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)] ( Hansen, 2002 ) for apples exported to Mexico. A better

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Sibylle Stoeckli, Karsten Mody, Silvia Dorn, and Markus Kellerhals

resistance to two lepidopteran, three aphid, and one mite species. Herbivore assessment was carried out on 160 apple genotypes in study Years 1 and 2 (2005 and 2006). The number of codling moth ( Cydia pomonella L.) larval penetrations in fruits was

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Kathleen Delate, Andrea McKern, Robert Turnbull, James T.S. Walker, Richard Volz, Allan White, Vincent Bus, Dave Rogers, Lyn Cole, Natalie How, Sarah Guernsey, and Jason Johnston

moth ( Cydia pomonella ) granulosis virus (CpGV) for codling moth control. Because the virus particles must be consumed by the larvae, products such as Madex (Key Industries, Ltd., Auckland, NZ) in Europe and New Zealand and Cyd-X (Certis USA, LLC

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Paul Randall, Peter Sholberg, Gary Judd, and Joan Cossentine

Codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a key pest of pome fruits worldwide. This insect overwinters as a diapausing, fifth-instar larva located within a silken cocoon usually constructed in cracks or crevices of bark on

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Liming Chen, Matthew Wallhead, Michael Reding, Leona Horst, and Heping Zhu

, P.W. 2017 Stability of Cacopsylla pyricola (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) populations in pacific northwest pear orchards managed with long-term mating disruption for Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Insects 8 105 Anco, D.J. Ellis, M.A. 2011

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Rachel Leisso, Bridgid Jarrett, Katrina Mendrey, and Zachariah Miller

Codling moth ( Cydia pomonella ) is a major insect pest of apple ( Malus domestica ) almost everywhere the fruit is grown. In Montana, frass-filled exit holes left by codling moth larva (strikes) were apparent on more than 50% of apple fruit in

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Kathleen Delate, Andrea McKern, Robert Turnbull, James T.S. Walker, Richard Volz, Allan White, Vincent Bus, Dave Rogers, Lyn Cole, Natalie How, Sarah Guernsey, and Jason Johnston

, L.G. Rehfield-Ray, L.M. 2006 Confirmation and efficacy tests against codling moth, Cydia pomonella , and oriental fruit moth, Grapholitha molesta , in apples using combined heat and controlled atmosphere treatments J. Econ

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Suzette P. Galinato, R. Karina Gallardo, David M. Granatstein, and Mike Willett

to investigate the risks of the municipal green waste movement practice. The study concluded that:  “The overall risk of entry of R. pomonella on MGW [municipal green waste] from the quarantined area to the PRA area is assessed as likely [emphasis

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James D. Hansen, Dennis J. Albano, and Millie L. Heidt

The two-component quarantine treatment was shown to be effective against at least 7,000 codling moth (Cydia pomonella) fifth instar larvae infesting `Fuji' apples (Malus × domestica) in each required confirmation test involving two sizes of cartons. After cold storage for 55 days at 36 °F (2.2 °C), infested fruit were placed in vented cartons, either 20-lb [7 × 12 × 12.5 inches (17.8 × 30.5 × 31.8 cm)], or 40-lb [12 × 12.5 × 20.5 inches (30.5 × 31.8 × 52.1 cm)], then fumigated with 0.056 oz/ft3 (56 g·m-3) of methyl bromide for 2 hours at 50 °F (10.0 °C). After each treatment, either no survivors were present or no moribund larvae survived beyond the first week of post evaluation of the larvae.