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parameters of a Cantaloupe- (Charentais) type melon crop ( Cucumis melo L. cv. Gandalf) under greenhouse. Materials and Methods Isolates of T. saturnisporum used in experiments Two isolates of T. saturnisporum (T1 and T2) were selected for their known

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translocated from the source to fruit sink in the Cucurbitaceae family, including Cucumis melo ( Chrost and Schmitz, 1997 ; Mitchell et al., 1992 ). The near absence of raffinose and stachyose in the melon fruit flesh points to the rapid hydrolysis and

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Muskmelon ( Cucumis melo L.) is a cultivar of Cucumis melo and a warm-season cucurbit species that belongs to family cucurbitaceae ( Farcuh et al., 2020 ; Jeffrey, 1980 ; Kirkbride, 1993 ). They are often readily available from the late

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Seedling leaf segments of 4 Cucumis melo L. cultivars were heated for 15 min at 50°C to observe the interaction of leaf age, temperature, and acclimation on membrane thermostability. Membrane injury was measured by the increase in solution conductivity due to electrolyte leakage from leaf segments. The threshold temperature for C. melo leaf membrane leakage was about 40°, and 50° was the approximate inflection temperature for 50% injury. Leaf age, growing temperature, and acclimation influenced membrane thermostabilities. Within 5-day-old leaves, heat tolerance was influenced significantly by the growing temperature during 24 hr prior to heat injury.

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( Cucumis melo L.) in the United States and other regions of the world ( Babadoost, 2005 ; Gevens et al., 2008 ; Hausbeck et al., 2012 ; Henz and Lima, 1998 ; McGovern et al., 1993 ; Tuset-Barrachina, 1977 ). A severe blight of cucurbits including

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Melon ( Cucumis melo L.), a diploid crop belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family, is a vegetable of commercial importance ( Grumet et al. 2021 ). These melons are sweet, aromatic, and nutritious ( Cui et al. 2022 ), and therefore their production

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cultivated in Cu-rich substrates could be a valuable strategy to reduce excessive Cu accumulation. Melon ( Cucumis melo L.) is the third most largely cultivated horticultural crop in Italy [Italian Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) 2021]. The consumption of

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Consumer demand for fruit and vegetables, including Cucumis melo L. (muskmelon), has increased over the past two decades ( Lucier and Jerardo, 2007 ; Pollack, 2001 ), some of which may be the result of growing awareness of contributions to good

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In a survey of 49 cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), 12 had bitter seedlings and 37 were non-bitter. Bitterness was shown to be controlled by a single dominant gene designated Bi/bi in crosses of bitter ‘Honey Dew’ and the non-bitter ‘Wheat City’ and ‘Queen of Colorado’.

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This article examines the nutritional quality and human health benefits of melons, specifically, muskmelon or cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.) and honeydew melon (Cucumis melo L. var. inodorus Naud.) types. Melons are naturally low in fat and sodium, have no cholesterol, and provide many essential nutrients such as potassium, in addition to being a rich source of beta-carotene and vitamin C. Although melons are an excellent source of some nutrients, they are low in others, like vitamin E, folic acid, iron, and calcium. Since the U.S. diet is already high in fat and protein content, melons should be included in everyone's diet, along with five to eight servings per day of a variety of other fruit and vegetables, to ensure adequate nutrition, promote individual health, and reduce one's risk of cancer and certain other chronic diseases.

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