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Diánez Fernando, Santos Milagrosa, Carretero Francisco, and Marín Francisco

parameters of a Cantaloupe- (Charentais) type melon crop ( Cucumis melo L. cv. Gandalf) under greenhouse. Materials and Methods Isolates of T. saturnisporum used in experiments Two isolates of T. saturnisporum (T1 and T2) were selected for their known

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Yosef Burger and Arthur A. Schaffer

translocated from the source to fruit sink in the Cucurbitaceae family, including Cucumis melo ( Chrost and Schmitz, 1997 ; Mitchell et al., 1992 ). The near absence of raffinose and stachyose in the melon fruit flesh points to the rapid hydrolysis and

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Bao-Zhong Yuan, Zhi-Long Bie, and Jie Sun

Muskmelon ( Cucumis melo L.) is a cultivar of Cucumis melo and a warm-season cucurbit species that belongs to family cucurbitaceae ( Farcuh et al., 2020 ; Jeffrey, 1980 ; Kirkbride, 1993 ). They are often readily available from the late

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Ryan S. Donahoo, William W. Turechek, Judy A. Thies, and Chandrasekar S. Kousik

( Cucumis melo L.) in the United States and other regions of the world ( Babadoost, 2005 ; Gevens et al., 2008 ; Hausbeck et al., 2012 ; Henz and Lima, 1998 ; McGovern et al., 1993 ; Tuset-Barrachina, 1977 ). A severe blight of cucurbits including

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Karen Salandanan, Marisa Bunning, Frank Stonaker, Oktay Külen, Patricia Kendall, and Cecil Stushnoff

Consumer demand for fruit and vegetables, including Cucumis melo L. (muskmelon), has increased over the past two decades ( Lucier and Jerardo, 2007 ; Pollack, 2001 ), some of which may be the result of growing awareness of contributions to good

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Gene Lester

This article examines the nutritional quality and human health benefits of melons, specifically, muskmelon or cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.) and honeydew melon (Cucumis melo L. var. inodorus Naud.) types. Melons are naturally low in fat and sodium, have no cholesterol, and provide many essential nutrients such as potassium, in addition to being a rich source of beta-carotene and vitamin C. Although melons are an excellent source of some nutrients, they are low in others, like vitamin E, folic acid, iron, and calcium. Since the U.S. diet is already high in fat and protein content, melons should be included in everyone's diet, along with five to eight servings per day of a variety of other fruit and vegetables, to ensure adequate nutrition, promote individual health, and reduce one's risk of cancer and certain other chronic diseases.

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Paula P. Chee

A procedure for the regeneration of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cv. Topmark via shoot organogenesis from cotyledon explants is described. The best induction medium for a morphogenic response was MS salts and vitamins medium with BA at 1.0 mg·liter-1. Further vegetative bud development was completed by transferring organogenic tissue to MS medium containing BA at 0.05 mg·liter-1 . The shoots were rooted in MS medium containing NAA at 0.01 mg·liter-1. Morphologically normal plantlets were obtained. Chemical abbreviations used: 6-benzylaminopurine (BA); indoleacetic acid (IAA); naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

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W.A. Mackay, T.J Ng, and F.A. Hammerschlag

Genetics of the host-pathogen interaction between Cucumis melo L. (muskmelon) and Myrothecium roridum were investigated by evaluating six populations: the parents, F1, F2, BCP1 and BCP2 of crosses between `Hales Best' (tolerant), `Perlita' (intermediate) and `Iroquois' (susceptible). A spore inoculation bioassay with detached-leaves was used to determine levels of resistance. Resistance was determined by measuring necrotic lesion diameter, chlorotic plus necrotic lesion diameter, and a subjective rating score. Parents and F1s had consistent performance while the segregating generations were inconsistent. Factors contributing to the response will be discussed.

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W.A. Mackay, T.J Ng, and F.A. Hammerschlag

Genetics of the host-pathogen interaction between Cucumis melo L. (muskmelon) and Myrothecium roridum were investigated by evaluating six populations: the parents, F1, F2, BCP1 and BCP2 of crosses between `Hales Best' (tolerant), `Perlita' (intermediate) and `Iroquois' (susceptible). A spore inoculation bioassay with detached-leaves was used to determine levels of resistance. Resistance was determined by measuring necrotic lesion diameter, chlorotic plus necrotic lesion diameter, and a subjective rating score. Parents and F1s had consistent performance while the segregating generations were inconsistent. Factors contributing to the response will be discussed.

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Joseph N. Wolukau, Xiao-Hui Zhou, Ying Li, Yong-Bin Zhang, and Jin-Feng Chen

varieties of melo, reticulatus, muskmelon, inodorus, conomon, and agrestis groups; wild cucumis species; and other cucurbits, mainly watermelon ( Citrullus spp.). Test accessions consisted of those reported elsewhere as resistant/susceptible to D. bryoniae