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Guide to the Flowers of Western China. Christopher Grey-Wilson and Phillip Cribb. 2011. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey. Distributed by University of Chicago Press, 1427 E. 60th Street Chicago, IL. 642 pp. 2400 color plates, 10 maps

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well as helped to conserve rare species and broadened the base of plants available for use in U.S. landscapes ( Aiello and Dosmann, 2010 ). We describe a new cultivar of Loropetalum chinense , or Chinese fringe flower, a selection originating from seed

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Loropetalum chinensevar.rubrum, Chinese fringe-flower, was introduced into the United States in 1989 and quickly became on of the most popular plants in the nursery trade. Growth abnormalities (little-leaf disorder) became a problem on container-grown plants in pine bark substrates during the late 1990s. Symptoms are as follows: darkening of older growth, shortening of internodes, upward cupping of leaves, crinkling of new growth, particularly the distal part of the leaf, decrease in leaf size. In severe cases leaf necrosis occurs along with stem elongation, thus branches appear to be elongating without new leaves. Petioles become very short. Branchlets may also be reflexed or drooping. In Florida, an eriophyid mite has been touted as the causal agent for the disorder. On plants sampled from Georgia nurseries, eriophyid mites have never been detected. `Ruby' consistently has the problem, while it has also been noted on `Sizzling Pink' and `Suzanne'. Plants in the ground do not express the problem. There may be an element present in native soil that is not supplied in sufficient quantity in organic substrates. Foliage from a commercial nursery was sampled for micronutrients concentrations. Initial data indicated that copper, zinc, and nickel were low and could be causing the problem. In May 2005, a study was initiated at a commercial nursery in Grady County, Ga. Copper and zinc sulfate, along with nickel lignonsulfonate, was applied as foliar sprays to symptomatic plants of `Suzanne' growing in #5 containers. Within two weeks after treatment, plants sprayed with copper sulfate resumed normal growth. Control plants, or plants treated with zinc or nickel did not resume normal growth. A second study was initiated in June to evaluate different rates of copper sulfate and Kocide, a copper fungicide. Medium to high rates of copper sulfate and the high label rate of Kocide were effective. The plants in this study had severe symptoms and required repeat applications of copper. Further research is needed on appropriate formulations of copper, rates of application, and rates of incorporation into pine bark substrates to eliminate the problem.

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Fumariaceae ( Liden et al., 1997 ). The former Latin name, Dicentra spectabilis , translates as “spectacular two spurs,” while Lamprocapnos means “bright smoke,” both referring to the flowers. It is a spectacular flower known for at least 2000 years for its

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meaning “hair flower,” which describes the fragrant and delicately fringed white corolla (petals). The young fruits are cut into pieces and boiled. As the fruit ages, it becomes bitter. Like many other bitter fruits, the bitterness is considered a

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Actinidia deliciosa A. Chev. and A. chinensis Planch. are dioecious species that have vegetative and compound buds, with flower clusters produced in the leaf axils of the first four to six nodes. Male and female flowers are perfect

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flowers and spindle-shaped fruits, is a threatened species, only distributed in the western part of the Hunan Province in China. Since no regeneration in the wild has been observed, reproducing this plant is an essential step in its conservation and

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% conifer wood biochar (produced at 450 °C) supplementation resulted in the greatest plant height and number of flowers for rose ( Rosa rugosa T.) plants ( Fascella et al. 2018 ). Additionally, viola ( Viola cornuta L.) grown in hardwood biochar mixtures

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Tlaxcala, Mexico ( Crews and Gliessman, 1991 ), the ancient raised gardens near Lake Titicaca ( Erickson, 1992 ), and RF in southern China and Oceania ( Renard et al., 2012 ) show close similarities with the chinampas. There are also analogies with RF in

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for their white flowers in feathery panicles and decorative blue fruits. With the exception of the pink-flowered C. pubescens Kunth from Ecuador, the evergreen tropical and subtropical Chionanthus spp. (syn Linociera Sw.) are usually not

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