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Redbud ( Cercis L. spp., Fabaceae: Caesalpiniodeae: Cercideae), are popular ornamental small trees or shrubs valued commercially for their showy early spring bloom, heart-shaped leaves, and adaptability to diverse environmental conditions. Each

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The genus Cercis L. (Fabaceae: Caesalpinoideae: Cercideae), also known as redbud, is a valuable commodity in the North American landscape industry and can be found growing in temperate environments across the globe. Cercis consists of ≈10

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redbud ( Cercis canadensis var. mexicana ) irrigated with water at EC of 1.6, 3.0, or 6.0 dS·m −1 (control, EC 3, or EC 6). Vertical bars represent se s (n = 8). Flushing: all containers were flushed with tap water to leach out salts. Plant

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Cercis canadensis , a leguminous tree, is native to North America and cultivated widely as an ornamental. Flowers emerge directly from the stem or trunk before the leaves early in the spring. Petal colors range from purple to pink to red or white. A

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affecting the dormancy of Cercis siliquastrum seeds. In walnut seeds, phenolics are believed to inhibit germination ( Matok et al., 2009 ). In addition, organic acids, polyphenolic compounds, flavonoids, and alkaloids have been identified as potential

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used to communicate to the consuming public the positive economic and environmental value of trees in the landscape. Materials and Methods The nursery production system modeled in this study was a field-grown, 5-cm (2-in) caliper Cercis canadensis

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Cercis canadensis, Eastern Redbud, is very Cercis canadensis, Eastern Redbud, is very susceptible to infection by Verticillium Wilt caused bysusceotible to infection by Verticillium Wilt caused by the common soil-borne fungi Verticillium albo-atrum and Verticillium dahliae. Little is known about the inoculum levels, the time required for natural infection to occur and how fast the pathogen travels inside the host species. One-year-old Cercis canadensis seedlings were planted in 7.6 liter (2-gallon) containers with a 1:1:2 soil/sand/perlite mix inoculated with five levels (0, 10, 100, 500, and 1000 microsclerotia/g soil) of V. dahliae prior to planting. At the end of the first growing season, half of the plants were removed from the containers, surface sterilized, dissected and root sections plated out on a Verticillium selective media. The remaining plants were grown for a second season. Infection first occurred in plants which received 100, 500 or 1000 ms/g at the end of the first season. The infection had spread at least 5 cm during the first growing season.

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Seed dormancy in Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis var. canadensis L.) can be overcome by seedcoat scarification to allow water imbibition, followed by chilling stratification to permit germination. During chilling stratification, there was an increase in the growth potential of the embryo as indicated by the ability of the isolated embryo to germinate in osmotic solutions. Penetration resistance of the testa also decreased after chilling stratification. The combination of seedcoat alteration and the increase in embryonic growth potential was associated with overcoming dormancy in redbud seed. GA3 or ethephon (50 μm) stimulated germination (28% and 60%, respectively) and increased the growth potential of treated embryos. Chemical names used: gibberellic acid (GA3), (2-chloroethyl) phosphoric acid (ethephon).

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The genus Cercis L. (redbud; Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae: Cercideae) is a morphologically and biogeographically diverse group with seven to thirteen species or subspecies that occur in North America, Europe, and Asia ( Chen et al., 2010 ; Davis et

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Abstract

An examination of dormancy in seeds of Eastern Redbud, Cercis canadensis L., showed that dormancy is controlled by permeability of the testa. Scarification by H2SO4 or mechanical abrasion permitted rapid and complete germination of dormant seed. Stratification was necessary only if seed were not scarified. Nonscarified seeds showed almost no water uptake during 55 days at 5°C, while scarified seeds had a steep imbibitional gradient. Germination was not stimulated by adding oxygen. No growth inhibitors were detected in dormant seed, and no promoters were found in chilled seeds.

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