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Sabine R. Green, Geno A. Picchioni, Leigh W. Murray, and Marisa M. Wall

. Porat et al. (1995) reported that flowering of cockscomb celosia ( C. argentea var. plumosa ) is delayed under long photoperiods (>16 h). Thus, the facultative short-day flowering requirement for cockscomb celosia ( Dole and Wilkins, 2005 ) may have

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Ryan M. Warner

bedding plant crops such as the number of flowers and branches. Celosia argentea L. var. plumosa Voss (celosia) is a facultative (or quantitative) short-day plant ( Piringer and Borthwick, 1961 ). Celosia often exhibits premature flowering in

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Loutrina Staley, D.G. Mortley, C.K. Bonsi, A. Bovell-Benjamin, and P. Gichuhi

al., 1995 ), Celosia ( Celosia argentea ) ( Orhue, 2010 ), Gboma ( Solanum macrocarpon ) ( AVRDC, 2002 ), and Long Bean ( Vigna unguiculata ) ( Chitindingu, 2005 ; Mosha et al., 1995 ; Palada et al., 2006 ), are highly nutritious niche market

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Michael A. Ortiz, Krystyna Hyrczyk, and Roberto G. Lopez

. 2007 Productivity and quality of statice ( Limonium sinuatum cv. Soiree Mix) and cockscomb ( Celosia argentea cv. Chief Mix) under organic and inorganic fertilization regiments Sci. Hort. 114 199 206 Wells, O.S. Loy, J.B. 1993 Row covers and high

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Samantha R. Nobes, Karen L. Panter, and Randa Jabbour

( Celosia argentea ) (Harris Seeds, Rochester, NY). Flowers were selected to span a range of types and families that could add diversity for Wyoming growers. Experimental design The experiment was conducted in both greenhouse and high

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Margaret J. Makinde and Adenike O. Olufolaji

Celosia trigyna has become an underutilized species of Celosia in Nigeria, it is known to be medicinal and very nutritive. It is therefore intended that with their collection and evaluation, they could be domesticated. So far four varieties have been identified and described. All of them have a high tendency of shattering of the seeds from the inflorescence. The plant structure for all of them is prostrate, the varieties described are: NHcta01, NHcta03, NHcta4, and NHcta7. It was dicovered that compared with C. argentea, they branch profusely and the leaves are smaller and ovate rather than lancolate.

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Richard L. Harkess and Robert E. Lyons

Seeds of Celosia argentea L. `Pampas Plumes', Cosmos sulphureus Cav., Helianthus annuus L. `7111', and Zinnia elegans Jacq. `Gold Medal Mixture' were mixed with clean sand and hand-broadcasted over 60-ft2 (6.7-m2) plots at rates of 4 or 8 oz/1000 ft2 (122 or 244 g/100 m2). Each plot was either left undisturbed after sowing or the seed was raked into the soil surface. Estimated costs were calculated using the approximate number of seeds planted per plot and the cost per seed versus the number of plants reaching anthesis. Celosia and Zinnia bloomed for 42 days, Cosmos sulphureus for 28 days, and Helianthus for 12 days. Seeding rate had little effect on the number of plants maturing to flower in all species except Cosmos. There were no significant differences in number of weeds between treatments for any of the species. Raking the seed into the soil significantly improved germination at 2.5 and 5 weeks for Celosia, Cosmos, and Helianthus, but not for Zinnia. In Celosia, raking the seed into the soil more than doubled the number of plants maturing to flower, while in Cosmos the number reaching anthesis was not significantly altered by raking. The lowest costs per flowering plant occurred when the seed was raked into the soil for Celosia, Helianthus, and Zinnia.

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Jeff A. Anderson

objectives were to determine if FreezePruf 1) lowered the freezing temperature of detached tomato leaves in test tubes in a circulating bath, 2) lowered the freezing temperature of pepper and celosia seedlings in a convection chamber, 3) lowered the freezing

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Richard L. Harkess and Robert E. Lyons

Seeds of Celosia argentea plumosa L. `Pampas Plumes', Cosmos sulphureus Cav., Helianthus annuus L. `7111', and Zinnia elegans Jacq. `Gold Medal Mixture' were mixed with clean sand and hand-broadcast over 6.7-m2 plots at rates of 122 or 244 g/100 m2. Each plot was either left undisturbed after sowing or the seed was raked into the soil surface. Treatments were applied in a complete factorial design and replicated three times. Germination counts were taken 2.5 and 5 weeks after sowing. The dates of flowering, number of plants flowering, and number of weeds present were recorded at anthesis. The Celosia and Zinnia bloomed for 42 days, Cosmos sulphureus for 28 days, and Helianthus for 12 days. Seeding rate had little affect on the number of plants maturing to flower in all species except Cosmos. There were no significant differences in number of weeds between treatments for any of the species. Raking the seed into the soil significantly improved germination at both 2.5 and 5 weeks in Celosia, Cosmos, and Helianthus, but not Zinnia. In Celosia, raking the seed in more than doubled the number of plants maturing to flower, while in Cosmos, the number reaching anthesis was not significant.

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Lee Ann Pramuk and Erik S. Runkle

Commercial greenhouse growers often produce bedding plants from midwinter to early summer, and thus crops are grown under a wide range of environmental conditions. Despite bedding plants' high economic value, the interactions of temperature and photosynthetic daily light integral (DLI) on growth and flowering have not been determined for many bedding plants. We grew celosia (Celosia argentea L. var. plumosa L.) and seed impatiens (Impatiens wallerana Hook.f.) in glass greenhouses in a range of temperature (15 to 27 °C) and DLI (8 to 26 mol·m-2·d-1) conditions to quantify effects on growth and flowering. Growth (e.g., plant dry mass at flowering) and flowering characteristics (e.g., time to flowering and flower bud number) were modeled in response to the average daily temperature and DLI by using multiple regression analysis. Rate of progress to flowering (1/days to flower) of celosia increased as temperature increased up to ≈25 °C and as the average DLI increased to 15 ·mol·m-2·d-1. Impatiens grown under a DLI <15 mol·m-2·d-1 flowered progressively earlier as temperature increased from 14 to 28 °C, whereas temperature had little effect on flowering time when plants were grown under the highest DLI treatments. Number of flowers and flower buds at first flowering increased in both species as temperature decreased or DLI increased. Shoot dry mass at first flowering followed a similar trend, except celosia dry mass decreased as temperature decreased. The models developed to predict flowering time and plant quality could be used by commercial growers to determine the impacts of changing growing temperature, growing plants at different times of the year, and providing supplemental lighting.