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  • Brassica oleracea var. acephala x
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. pabularia and Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala ) are frequently consumed vegetables in the United States and in other countries. They contain potential health-promoting bioactive compounds including glucosinolates and dietary antioxidants such as

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using LED. Exposure to only red LED light resulted in both plant elongation and reduced biomass for lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.; Hoenecke et al., 1992 ) and pepper ( Capsicum annuum L.; Brown et al., 1995 ). Kale ( Brassica oleracea L. var

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organic fertilizer (3N–0.4P–4.1K) was used in 2006. Bradfield Organics (Springfield, MO) fertilizers contain alfalfa, molasses, sulfate of potash, poultry byproduct meal, and humates. The crop used was collard greens ( Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala

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Ornamental cabbage ( Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala D.C.) is a common potted bedding plant all over the World. The ornamental cabbage aesthetic value in particular its attractive colored foliage, make it a very popular annual in the home

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Fernandes, F. Pinho, P.G. Valentao, P. Pereira, J.A. Andrade, P.B. 2009 Volatile constituents throughout Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala germination J. Agr. Food Chem. 57 15 6795 6802 Filgueira, F.A.R. 2008 Novo manual de olericultura: Agrotecnologia

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lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.), kale ( Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala ), and chicory ( Cichorium endivia L.) leaves were harvested in the morning, placed in plastic bags, and brought to the São Carlos Embrapa Instrumentation Laboratory, where

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-carotene concentrations in vegetable crops through cultural management techniques would be beneficial to the health status of consumers. Kale ( Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala D.C.) ranks highest and spinach ( Spinacia oleracea L.) ranks second among vegetable

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Abstract

Cropping systems were compared among vegetable crops which are commonly grown for profit on a 5–10 ha farm. Tomato [Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.) ‘Jet Star’], cabbage [Brassica oleracea (L.) var. capitata ‘Sunup’], collards [Brassica oleracea (L.) var. acephala ‘Vates’], and muskmelon [Cucumis melo (L.) ‘Gold Star’] were monocropped; cabbage was intercropped with tomatoes; and collards were intercropped with muskmelon. Crop yield, production cost, and economic returns of the intercrop system were comparable to those of the crops produced alone.

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Abstract

Correlation coefficients based on relative concentrations of 13 glucosinolates in the edible parts of 30 cultivars were determined. Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. gemmifera group), cauliflower (B. oleracea L. botrytis group), and either marrow-stem or smooth-leafed kale (B. oleracea L. acephala group) had similar glucosinolate patterns based on significant correlations (P < 0.01). The glucosinolates of ‘Morris Heading’ collards [(B. oleracea L. acephala group (var. sabellica)] were highly correlated with those of curly kale [B. oleracea L. acephala group (var. selensia)]. Mustard greens [B. juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss. var. rugosa Bailey] and the corresponding seeds were the most highly correlated of the 17 cultivars for which the edible parts and seeds were compared. Seed analyses indicated relationships among the cultivars somewhat similar to those seen for the edible portions.

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Green leafy vegetables are important sources of dietary carotenoids, and members of Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala rank highest for reported levels of lutein and β-carotene. Twenty-three leafy B. oleracea cultigens were field grown under similar fertility over two separate years and evaluated for leaf lutein and β-carotene accumulation. Choice of B. oleracea cultigen and year significantly affected carotenoid levels. Lutein concentrations ranged from a high of 13.43 mg per 100 g fresh weight (FW) for B. oleracea var. acephala `Toscano' to a low of 4.84 mg/100 g FW for B. oleracea var. acephala 343-93G1. β-carotene accumulations ranged from a high of 10.00 mg/100 g FW for B. oleracea var. acephala `Toscano' to a low of 3.82 mg/100 g FW for B. oleracea var. acephala 30343-93G1. Carotenoid concentrations were significantly higher in year 2 than in year 1, but rank order among the cultigens for both lutein and ß-carotene did not change between the years. During each year, there were high correlations between leaf carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments. Under similar growing conditions, choice of B. oleracea cultigen will influence carotenoid accumulation, and this may affect the health benefits of consuming these leafy green vegetable crops.

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