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Cindy L. McKenzie and Joseph P. Albano

, Bemisia tabaci Fla. Entomol. 74 162 166 Kring, J.B. Schuster, D.J. Price, J.F. Simone, G.W. 1991 Sweetpotato whitefly-vectored geminivirus on tomato in Florida Plant Dis. 75 1186 (Abstr.) McAuslane, H.J. 2007 Sweetpotato whitefly B biotype of silverleaf

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James D. McCreight, Hsing-Yeh Liu, and Thomas A. Turini

symptoms followed by sweetpotato whitefly ( Bemisia tabaci ) biotype B inoculation. Materials and Methods Germplasm evaluation and genetic studies of resistance to CuLCrV were done in naturally infected field and controlled

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Toshio Shibuya, Junki Komuro, Norio Hirai, Yoshiko Sakamoto, Ryosuke Endo, and Yoshiaki Kitaya

attractive to herbivores, they may be able to reduce both pest numbers and the use of pesticides at transplanting. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the preference of adult SPWF ( Bemisia tabaci biotype B) to cucumber ( Cucumis sativus ) seedlings grown

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James D. McCreight and William M. Wintermantel

, 1965 ; Tzanetakis et al., 2003 ; Wintermantel, 2004 ). Sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), biotype B (SPWF-B) adversely affects yield and quality of a wide range of vegetable and agronomic crops worldwide directly through feeding

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Alvin M. Simmons and Amnon Levi

The B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), feeds on and damages numerous vegetable crops including watermelon (Citrullus sp.). Seven watermelon cultivars, a triploid line, and 16 U.S. Plant Introduction accessions (PIs) of C. lanatus var. lanatus; 10 PIs of C. lanatus var. citroides; and eight PIs of C. colocynthis, were evaluated for resistance to B. tabaci. Bioassays were based on nonpreference and performance of the whiteflies on the 42 Citrullus genotypes. Most of the watermelon cultivars and C. lanatus PIs tested were highly susceptible to whitefly infestation, while the C. colocynthis accessions exhibited whitefly resistance. Among the C. colocynthis accessions tested, PI 386015, PI 386018, and PI 386024 were most resistant to B. tabaci. This study identified useful sources of germplasm that can be used for the improvement of watermelon for resistance to whiteflies.

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Chang-chi Chu*, Kai Umeda, Tian-Ye Chen, Alvin M. Simmons, and Thomas H. Henneberry

Insect traps are vital component of many entomological programs for detection and monitoring of insect populations. We equipped yellow (YC), blue (BC) sticky card (BC) with 530 nm lime green (LED-YC) and 470 nm blue (LED-BC) light-emitting diodes, respectively that increased trap catches of several insect pests. The LED-YC traps caught 1.3, 1.4, 1.8, and 4.8 times more adult greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood), sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B, cotton aphids Gossypium hirsutum (L.), and fungus gnats Bradysia coprophila (Lintner), respectively, compared with standard YC traps. The LED-YC traps did not catch more Eretmocerus spp. than the standard YC traps. Eretmocerus spp. are important B. tabaci parasitoids used in greenhouse biological control programs. For whitefly control in greenhouse the 530 nm lime green LED equipped plastic cup trap designed by Chu et al. (2003) is the better choice than LED-YC trap because it catches few Eretmocerus spp. and Encarsia spp. whitefly parasitoids released for B. tabaci nymph control. The LED-BC traps caught 2.0-2.5 times more adult western flower thrips Franklinella occidentalis (Pergande) compared with the standard BC traps.

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N. Boissot, D. Lafortune, C. Pavis, and N. Sauvion

The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-Biotype is a major pest on cucurbits in the Caribbean islands. Five field trials were conducted to identify resistance among 80 genotypes of Cucumis melo L. from diverse geographic origins. We focused on resistant rather than tolerant genotypes by counting adults on the abaxial side of two leaves of each plant at least three times in each trial, and larval density of under leaf disk samples at least twice in each trial. On the basis of insect density, three Indian accessions, PI 414723, PI 164723, and 90625, and one Korean accession, PI 161375, had field resistance. On those accessions, we observed 3.6 to 6 times fewer adults than on the most susceptible genotypes (`AR Top Mark' or `Délice de Table') and 11 to 29 times fewer larvae than on `AR Top Mark' or B66-5. Those levels of resistance may be sufficient to significantly reduce pesticide use in Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles) where B. tabaci populations are lower than in the Southern United States or in the Mediterranean Basin. Higher levels of resistance are needed for genetic control, and may be achieved by a combination of different partial resistance genes.

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James D. McCreight, Hsing-Yeh Liu, and Thomas A. Turini

Cucurbit leaf crumple geminivirus (CuLCrV) is transmitted by sweet-potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) biotype B (SPWF-B) and occurs on cucurbits in Arizona, California, Texas, and Mexico. This virus is identical to Cucurbit leaf curl virus, and their symptoms are similar to Squash leaf curl virus on squash (Cucurbita sp.) and Melonleaf curl virus on melon (Cucumis melo L.). Melon has been reported to be either susceptible to CuLCrV, or to have the ability to recover from infection. Twenty-three melon cultigens were inoculated with CuLCrV in greenhouse tests using SPWF-B. Eighteen of the cultigens tested were highly susceptible to CuLCrV (≥60% infected plants) and generally exhibited pronounced CuLCrV symptoms: `Amarillo', `Edisto 47', `Esteem', `Fuyu 3', `Impac', `Moscatel Grande', `Negro', `Perlita', PI 234607, PI 236355, PI 414723, `PMR 5', `Seminole', `Sol Dorado', `Sol Real', `Top Mark', `Vedrantais', and WMR 29. Five cultigens were resistant to CuLCrV (<40% infected plants that exhibited restricted, mild symptoms): MR-1, PI 124111, PI 124112, PI 179901, and PI 313970. Symptoms abated with time in both groups although infected plants remained positive for the virus. Ten of the cultigens (`Edisto 47', `Fuyu 3', `Impac', MR-1, PI 124112, PI 313970, PI 414723, `PMR 5', `Top Mark', and WMR 29) were included in field tests in 2003 and 2004 that were naturally infected with CuLCrV. With the exception of PI 414723, the greenhouse and field data were consistent for reaction to CuLCrV.

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Tian-Ye Chen, Chang-chi Chu, Thomas J. Henneberry, and Kai Umeda

Insects in a commercial poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) greenhouse were monitored with yellow sticky card (YC) traps and YC equipped with 530-nm lime green light-emitting diodes (LED-YC) traps from 3 June to 25 Nov. 2002. Pest insects were: dark-winged fungus gnat (Bradysia coprophila), sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) biotype B (= B. argentifolii), western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and leafhopper (Empoasca sp.). Natural enemies were: minute pirate bug (Orius tristicolor), parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera), and rove beetles (Staphylinidae). Over the 24 weeks of the experiment, LED-YC traps captured more dark-winged fungus gnats, sweet potato whiteflies, leafhoppers, and rove beetles compared with YC traps. Capture of western flower thrips, minute pirate bugs, and parasitic wasps were not significantly increased on the YC traps equipped with LEDs. The results indicate that the LED-YC traps attract three major pest insects in poinsettia greenhouses and do not catch more beneficial, minute pirate bugs and parasitic wasps, but may catch significant number of rove beetles. The results suggest that LED-YC traps may be useful to monitor and reduce pest populations in greenhouses.

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John L. Coffey, Alvin M. Simmons, B. Merle Shepard, Yaakov Tadmor, and Amnon Levi

Monitoring insecticide resistance in Biotype B of Bemisia tabaci (Hempitera: Aleyrodidae) in Florida Fla. Entomol. 96 1243 1256 Chensheng, L. Warchol, K.M. Callahan, R.A. 2014 Sub-lethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before