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Australian Horticultural Research and Development Corporation. Our deep appreciation is expressed to Geoff Connellan for coordinating the project and securing funds for the project and assisting with the report, to Ross Hall for his assistance with the

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of Primary Industries, Brisbane, Lesley Taylor, Middleton, Tasmania, Sue Durbin, Horticultural Therapy Society of NSW Inc., and Christine Perrers, Joseph Banks Centre, Australian National Botanic Gardens, Dickson, ACT. The cost of publishing this

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Abstract

The cut-flower and potted plant industries in Australia have traditionally been based on exotic species. However, native Australian plants have gradually assumed greater importance—particularly in the expanding export trade, but also on local markets. Floriculture is practiced in all Australian states, with the major production areas for exotic cut-flowers (e.g., roses, carnations) and potted plants being close to the state capital cities. The cultivation of native Australian flowers and of South African Proteaceae tends to be somewhat more decentralized.

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Sweet oranges, particularly ‘Valencia’ and ‘Washington’ navel, are the main cultivars grown. Processing into juice products has become the most important market. A number of cultivars of Australian origin, ‘Leng’ and ‘Lane Late’ navels, ‘Imperial’ mandarin and ‘Ellendale’ tangor, are important and several have created worldwide interest.

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Australian horticultural research and development is now co-ordinated by an industry supported, federal government statutory body — the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation (HRDC). The Corporation, constituted in 1987, co-ordinated project funding to the value of just over $10 million in 1991/92. More than 300 projects are now supported, covering all sectors of horticulture.

Federal government funds are available to match industry contributions to a value of up to 0.5% gross value of product.

Traditional funding organisations are reducing commitments to research and development, thus placing increasing pressure on industries to help themselves on a user-pays basis.

Examples will be provided of completed projects which are proving of great value to Australian horticultural domestic and export opportunities.

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member of the Australian flora that has been developed as an international horticultural food crop. The crop initially was commercialized in Hawaii in the early 20th century, following introduction into the islands in the late 19th century. Australia is

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We surveyed 22 Australian nurseries in 1995 to: 1) develop a profile of Australian nurseries from a production, management, and profitability perspective; 2) compare the data to relevant U.S. benchmarks; and 3) identify trends and potential areas of improvement in the management of Australian nursery enterprises. The study confirmed that Australian nurseries incur high labor costs (38.8% of sales) that are comparable to United States nurseries, while costs of materials and supplies were lower than their U.S. counterparts. Overall, the costs of the surveyed nurseries appeared lower than their U.S. counterparts. Concerns of managers were directed towards recruiting and keeping labor and marketing rather than increasing capital investment to increase production efficiency. Capital expenditures tended to be funded from internal cash flows rather than external borrowings. Many of the nursery managers used relatively simple performance indicators and most business objectives were stated in general terms. Australian nurseries carried more diverse product ranges than the U.S. nurseries. Many of the nurseries adopted quite vigorous marketing strategies with a stronger emphasis on marketing than in those in the U.S. Concerns about the viability of the industry included oversupply, the growth in chain stores business, factors eroding the demand for nursery products and greater regulation.

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the percentages of blank nuts of pistachio assessed before harvest each year and average daily minimum temperature from the Mildura, Australia, meteorological station from April to March of the following year (equivalent to October to September in the

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This work was partially-funded by a grant from the Rural Industry Research Development Corn. We thank Ausflora Pacific Pty. Ltd.; The Australian Protea Growers Assn., Australian Flower Exporters Ply. Ltd, and Growth Industries Ltd. for

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Drought is an increasing problem in many parts of the world ( IPCC, 2007 ). Australia is the driest inhabited continent with the vast majority of the land receiving less than 600 mm of rain each year ( Bowman, 2000 ) and declining as a result of

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