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Subhrajit K. Saha, Laurie E. Trenholm and J. Bryan Unruh

Gainesville. ‘Floratam’ St. Augustinegrass and a combination of ornamentals that included Canna generalis L. var. ‘Brandywine’, Ligustrum japonicum Thunb. var. ‘Lake Tresca’, Nandina domestica Thunb. var. ‘Harbor Dwarf’, and Allamanda cathartica L

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T.K. Broschat, D.R. Sandrock, M.L. Elliott and E.F. Gilman

similar compositions. Table 1. Fertilizer products applied to established st. augustinegrass turf, areca palm, pentas, allamanda, canna, and nandina in three experiments. Expt. 1 was conducted on established ‘Floratam’ st. augustinegrass turf in Davie

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Subhrajit K. Saha, Laurie E. Trenholm and J. Bryan Unruh

Due to increasing consumption of water in landscapes and concern over conservation of water resources, this study was conducted to determine the effect of fertilizer source on water consumption of turf and ornamentals and to compare total water use (WU) of st. augustinegrass and ornamentals. The experiment was performed in a climate-controlled greenhouse at the G.C. Horn Turfgrass Field Laboratory at the University of Florida in Gainesville. `Floratam' st. augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum Walt. Kuntze) was compared to a mix of common Florida ornamentals including canna (Canna generalis L.H. Bailey), nandina (Nandina domestica Thunb.), ligustrum (Ligustrum japonicum Thunb.), and allamanda (Allamanda cathartica L.). All plants were grown in 300-L plastic pots in Arredondo fine sand. There were three fertilizer treatments [quick-release fertilizers (QRF) 16–4–8 and 15–0–15, and slow-release fertilizer (SRF) 8–4–12] applied at 4.9 g N/m2 every 60 days. Water was applied as needed to maintain turgor and turfgrass pots were mowed weekly. Experimental design was a randomized complete block design with four replications. Visual quality ratings and time domain reflectometry (TDR) data were collected weekly. Both turf and ornamentals consumed less water and had higher water use efficiency (WUE) when treated with SRF. Ornamentals consumed from 11% to 83% more water than turf, depending on season. These results may have implications in future research on irrigation management to verify WUE between turf and ornamentals in an urban landscape.

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Timothy K. Broschat

. (2008) found no response to fertilization in pentas ( Pentas lanceolata ) or dwarf allamanda ( Allamanda cathartica ‘Hendersoni’), but nandina ( Nandina domestica ) grew larger with N-containing fertilizers than unfertilized controls. Fertilizer type

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Saad B. Javed, Abdulrahman A. Alatar, Mohammad Anis and Mohamed A. El-Sheikh

of endogenous hormones and the level of differentiation of cells ( Yan et al., 2009 ). Nodal explants have been used successfully with TDZ for regeneration in the golden trumpet [ Allamanda cathartica ( Khanam and Anis, 2018 )]. Our observations with

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Kaitlyn McBride, Richard J. Henny, Jianjun Chen and Terri A. Mellich

1.2 dS·m –1 . Established landscape plants of Allamanda cathartica ‘Hendersonii’ were used in an experiment testing four different fertilizers on growth and quality ( Broschat et al., 2008 ). The authors concluded that Allamanda in the landscape

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Amy L. Shober, Kimberly A. Moore, Nancy G. West, Christine Wiese, Gitta Hasing, Geoffrey Denny and Gary W. Knox

with 75 g·m −2 of 8N–0.9P–10K–4Mg); however, high rates of N induced magnesium deficiency, which eventually affected plant quality. In contrast, Broschat et al. (2008) found that quality of fertilized dwarf allamanda ( Allamanda cathartica

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Kimberly A. Moore, Amy L. Shober, Gitta Hasing, Christine Wiese and Nancy G. West

( Allamanda cathartica ) on Margate fine sand soil in southern Florida. On the basis of the results of our study, we suspect that soil conditions had a greater influence on shoot production and aesthetic quality of the tested ornamental species than N

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Amy L. Shober, Geoffrey C. Denny and Timothy K. Broschat

when plants were grown in fertile field soils ( Rose and Joyner, 2003 ). Similar findings are reported by Broschat et al. (2008) for pentas ( Pentas lanceolata ), dwarf allamanda ( Allamanda cathartica ), and nandina ( Nandina domestica ). Gilman and