Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • Acanthaceae x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Rosanna Freyre, Adam Moseley, Sandra B. Wilson, and Gary W. Knox

Ruellia L. is one of the largest genera in the Acanthaceae and consists of ≈250 species of perennial herbs, subshrubs, and shrubs with mostly tropical and subtropical distribution ( Ezcurra, 1993 ). Five species of Ruellia are native to Florida

Free access

Rosanna Freyre, Chad Uzdevenes, Liwei Gu, and Kenneth H. Quesenberry

There are ≈350 species of Ruellia L. (Acanthaceae) that are perennial herbs, subshrubs, or shrubs with mostly tropical and subtropical distributions ( Tripp and McDade, 2014 ). A chromosome number of 2 n = 2X = 34 appears to be widespread in this

Free access

Rosanna Freyre, Adam Moseley, Gary W. Knox, and Sandra B. Wilson

Ruellia L. consists of ≈250 species of perennial herbs, subshrubs, and shrubs with mostly tropical and subtropical distribution and is one of the largest genera in the Acanthaceae ( Ezcurra, 1983 ). Ruellia simplex Wright (commonly known as

Free access

Rosanna Freyre, Zhanao Deng, Gary W. Knox, Steven Montalvo, and Victor Zayas

Ruellia L. is the second largest genus in the Acanthaceae and consists of ≈300 species of perennial herbs, shrubs, small trees, and lianas with tropical, subtropical, or temperate distribution ( Tripp, 2007 ). Ruellia simplex Wright (commonly

Free access

Rosanna Freyre, Zhanao Deng, and Victor A. Zayas

Ruellia L. (Acanthaceae) consists of ≈300 species of perennial herbs, shrubs, small trees, and lianas with tropical, subtropical, or temperate distribution ( Tripp, 2007 ). Ruellia simplex Wright (commonly known as Mexican petunia, Mexican

Free access

Rosanna Freyre and Sandra B. Wilson

Ruellia (Acanthaceae) consists of ≈250 species of perennial herbs, subshrubs, and shrubs with mostly tropical and subtropical distribution. Ruellia simplex (commonly known as “Mexican Petunia” or “Mexican Bluebell”) is native to Mexico, the

Open access

Kenneth C. Sanderson, Willis C. Martin Jr, and Richard D. Patterson

Abstract

Total immersion of Pseuderanthemum atropurpureum L. H. Bailey, Sanchezia speciosa J. Leonard, and Strobilanthes dyeranus M. T. Mast. cuttings in aqueous solutions of the morphactins chlorflurecol and chlorflurenethol prior to propagation retarded plant growth 16 weeks after rooting. Height of Sanchezia and Strobilanthes also was reduced by dips of chlorfluren and dichlorflurecol and chlormequat chloride. Morphactins caused abnormal growth on Pseuderanthemum and Strobilanthes. Dips of PBA reduced the height of Pseuderanthemum and Strobilanthes. Pseuderanthemum height also was reduced by ancymidol and ethephon dips, and height was reduced on Strobilanthes by oxathiin and piproctanyl bromide. Chlorflurecol dips reduced plant dry weight of all species. Plant dry weight of Strobilanthes also was reduced by chlorofluren, chloroflurenthol, oxathiin, and PBA immersion. Ethephon, PBA, and chlorflurenthol dips also reduced Pseuderanthemum dry weight. Chemical names used: 2-chloro-9-hydroxy-9H-fluorene-9-carboxylic acid (chlorflurecol); 2-chlorofluorenecarbonic acid-(9)-methylester (dichloroflurecol); 2-chloro-9-hydroxyfluorene-carbonic acid-(9)-p-chlorophenoxyethylester (chloroflurenethol); 2-chloro-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium chloride (chlormequat chloride); N-(phenylmethyl)-9-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)-9H purin-6-amine (PBA); α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyI)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol); (2-chlorethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon); 2,3-dihydro-5,6-diphenyl-1,4-oxathiin (oxathiin); 1-(3,7-dimethyloctyl)-1-(2-propenyl)piperidinium bromide, (piproctanyl bromide).

Free access

Richard A. Criley and George W. Staples

A new name for an old plant is not necessarily welcome in the horticultural trades or in plant identification classes, but some name changes have been in existence long enough that textbooks and trade publications should have caught up with them. The objective of this poster is to call attention to some of these changes for horticultural plant identification courses. Traditional references such as Hortus Third (1976) and Exotica 8 (Graf, 1976) have been superseded by the second edition of The Plant Book (Mabberly, 1997) and The Index of Garden Plants (Griffiths, 1994), while some recent works (The Tropical Look, Riffle, 1998) have chosen to retain old names. The taxonomic research underlying a new book, Tropical Garden Flora (Staples and Herbst, in press), based on the second edition of In Gardens of Hawaii (Neal, 1965), has produced an abundance of name changes. This poster will illustrate and report genera and species name changes that have occurred for selected ornamentals in the Acanthaceae, Agavaceae, Araceae, Araliaceae, Arecaceae, Commelinaceae, and Moraceae families plus a few others.

Free access

Rosanna Freyre and Erin Tripp

There are ≈350 species of Ruellia (Acanthaceae) that are perennial herbs, subshrubs, or shrubs with mostly tropical and subtropical distributions ( Tripp and McDade, 2014 ). A chromosome number of 2 n = 34 appears to be widespread in this large

Full access

Amir Rezazadeh, Richard L. Harkess, and Guihong Bi

and flurprimidol and determine whether these PGRs increase firespike drought tolerance. Material and methods Firespike is a flowering perennial in the Acanthaceae, native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Central America ( Daniel, 1995 ). It