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Sciences (ZFRI-CAAS), was used as the male parent. The excellent plant ‘92-6-59’ was bred by crossing. In 1997, ‘Hong Shanhu’, a sweet nectarine bred by the Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, was selected as the female parent, and ‘NF9260

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were used to study genetic variation in buffalograss obtained from the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) to assess its genetic diversity. Our primary goal was to analyze the genetic relationships among these 10 buffalograss accessions and

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Agricultural Sciences, located in the northern of Henan Province, China (lat. 35°9′ N, long. 113°5′ E, altitude 78.7 m). The experimental site was located in a warm temperate continental monsoon climate zone with a mean annual temperature of 14.5 °C. The

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ventilation and irrigation protocols to promote tomato yield and quality. Materials and Methods Experimental site This study was conducted in a solar greenhouse at the Xinxiang Irrigation Research Base of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

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Abstract

On December 3, 1974 our Chief Executive wrote to the President of the National Academy of Sciences and to the Secretary of Agriculture calling for an assessment of the food problem. A program with research and development recommendations to insure our food supply and improve nutrition for ourselves and other nations was requested. Priorities were to be set, specific programs outlined, and needed resources determined. A report is now available (2).

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1 Visiting Fellow, Inst. of Vegetable and Floricultural Crops, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 30 Baishiquiao Ave., Beijing, China. 2 Professor, Dept. of Horticultural Sciences. 3 Professor, Dept. of Plant Pathology. The cost of

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We are grateful to Lin Rufa, Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences and Charles-Marie Messiaen (Le Teil, France) for providing accessions used in this study. This research was supported in part by project P4-0077.

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1 Visiting professor from the Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. 2 Visiting scholar from Guangdong Educational College, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. 3 Current address: Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional

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Observations made during 3 six week periods of cooperative breeding and development research between the Department of Horticulture, Auburn University and the Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences indicates that different valuable germplasm of many fruits are present in China. Such cooperation provides the opportunity for the exchange of enhanced germplasm and cultivars to improve many of the horticulture crops of America and China. Resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to drought, heat and nutrition stresses are found in the material.

The crops that appear to have the most immediate potential are the citrus with cold hardiness, kiwi of many improved types, pears of many types with fire blight resistance to chestnut blight and chestnut gall wasp, plums and plumcots with resistance to borers and many other crops such as raspberry, hawthorn, thorn pear and wolfberry.

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This research was funded by the programme of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Institute of Botany and China Agricultural University have contributing equally to this work. We thank Professor Douglas. D. Archbold, University of Kentucky, for his critical

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