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regeneration from cotyledonary node explants of Abelmoschus esculentus . Table 2. Effect of different concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGRs) in combination with silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) and Pluronic F-68 on shoot regeneration from cotyledonary node

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A total of 45 varieties of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) were evaluated for earliness in fruiting and high fruit yield. In Nigeria selection in okra is for large, spiny fruit with high drawing ability. So far the variety (cultivar) NHAC 47-4 has been well-accepted by both the Nigerian farmers and consumers. It fruit within 42 days and draws and retains fresh color when boiled. These new cultivars, NHAC147 and NHAC 148, were found to fruit within 38 to 40 days and they are of comparable yield of up to 40 fruit per plants. They were found to be drought-tolerant and carry fruit of up to five of same age and size-high degree of uniformity. They are therefore being recommended because they have short stems and NHAC148 has fewer spines than NHAC47-4 AND NHAC 147.

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Maximum yield was obtained from 120 lb. N/A; while, P and K had no favorable influence on yield. Fruit yield varied between years, probably because of rainfall variation.

Nitrogen and Cu levels of plants increased but P, Ca, and Zn levels decreased with N application. Applied P-K increased only P and K levels of the plants. Levels of N, Mg, and Cu were higher in 1969 than in 1968, but Fe showed a reverse trend. Nitrogen applications increased NO3 - accumulation in the fruit. Phosphorus and K concn were max in fruits; N, Zn, and Mn were high in leaves; and Ca and Mg concn were higher in green stems than in other tissues. Copper content was equally high in fruits and green stems. Roots contained max Fe, suggesting that okra plants tend to accumulate Fe in roots without translocating much to above-ground plant parts.

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[ Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench.] to photoperiod has been investigated ( Arulrajah and Ormrod, 1973 ; Rithichai et al., 2004 ), but only using white light for long-day treatment. We therefore investigated the reproductive response of three Abelmoschus

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scheduling methods, improve system design and equipment performance, and enhance farmers’ skills to manage irrigation systems efficiently ( Pereira et al., 2002 ). Okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus ) is one of the most important and widely grown crops found

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, butenolide [3-methyl- 2H -furo(2,3- c )pyran-2-one] ( Van Staden et al., 2004 ), on seedling growth of two popular vegetables, okra and tomato. Materials and Methods Trials were conducted on commercial seeds of okra [ Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench

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grown: ‘Moneymaker’ tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ), ‘Traviata’ eggplant ( Solanum melongena ), and ‘Clemson Spineless’ okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus ) in a greenhouse at the Marye Anne Fox Teaching Laboratory in Raleigh, NC (lat. 35.78°N, long. 78.64°W

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and row covers to produce warm season crops in Alaska Proc. Natl. Agr. Plastics Cong. 24 49 53 Rahman, N. Shadeque, A. 1999 Comparative efficacy of mulches with or without an herbicide on growth and yield of lady's finger [ Abelmoschus esculentus (L

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Abstract

Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes in scientific names are discussed for the following crops: Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb (almond); Fagopyrum esculentum Moench (buckwheat); Erythroxylum coca Lam. (coca); Lens culinaris Medic, (lentil); Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench (okra); Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch (pecan); Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata (southern pea or cowpea); Prunus avium (L.) L. (sweet cherry); and Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai (watermelon).

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Abstract

Of 260 plant introductions (PI) of okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench.] evaluated for disease resistance, 39 were resistant to southern root knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) (Chitwood)], 9 were resistant to fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (A & K) Snyder and Hansen, and 3 were resistant to both. An introduction of A. manihot L., a wild relative of okra, was highly resistant to fusarium wilt.

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