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Mohammed B. Tahboub, William C. Lindemann, and Leigh Murray

Mechanical pruning of trees is becoming increasingly common in commercial pecan orchards. This practice generates considerable biomass. For example, in Doña Ana County, N.M., an estimated 25,500 tons of pecan pruning wood is produced annually

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Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Tatjana Ćirković Mitrović, Ljubinko Rakonjac, Mersida Jandrić, and Dina Hadrović

.I.; Statpoint Technologies, Inc., Warrenton, VA). Results and Discussion All species studied had a greater N content and lesser C/N ratio in bark than in wood; in all species except in goat willow, the C content was greater in wood than in bark ( Table 1

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Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Saša Eremija, Zoran Miletić, Snežana Stajić, and Igor Golić

Technologies, Inc., Warrenton, VA). Results and Discussion All species studied, except for the european pear ( Pyrus communis L.), had a greater N content and lesser C/N ratio in their bark than in wood; in all species, the C content was greater in

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Geno A. Picchioni, Sharon A. Martinez, John G. Mexal, and Dawn M. VanLeeuwen

; Wright and Browder, 2005 ). Chipped wood from softwood trees has shown excellent potential to supplement peatmoss supplies with few changes in production practices ( Boyer et al., 2012a ; Murphy et al., 2011 ). Pine wood substrate studies on ornamental

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Mohammed B. Tahboub, William C. Lindemann, and Leigh Murray

dehydrogenase enzyme activity ( Boggs et al., 2000 ; Drinkwater et al., 1995 ; Reganold, 1993 ). In Doña Ana County, NM, alone, an estimated 25,500 t of pecan pruning wood is produced annually ( Cabral, 2005 ). Much of the pruning wood is burned as an

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Manuela Baietto and A. Dan Wilson

). Thus, tree mortality resulting from diseases, wood decay, and insects causes significant economic losses in many different ways. Despite the importance and valuable roles that landscape trees play in the enhancement of our quality of life, urban trees

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James Ferguson, Bala Rathinasabapathi, and Clinton Warren

containerized plant production ( Weston, 2005 ). However, wood chips and leaf mulches from several woody perennials, including southern redcedar and southern magnolia, may contain water-soluble natural products with phytotoxic activities and they could therefore

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W. Garrett Owen, Brian E. Jackson, Brian E. Whipker, and William C. Fonteno

wood as a substrate component for plant production have proven successful as an alternative for peatmoss ( Boyer et al., 2008 ; Gerber et al., 1999 ; Jackson et al., 2008a ; Wright et al., 2008 ). In contrast to peat-lite- (PL) and PB

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Paul C. Bartley III, Aziz Amoozegar, William C. Fonteno, and Brian E. Jackson

used in gas pycnometry. Materials and Methods Coir, peat, and pine bark, three common substrate base components as well as perlite and wood chips, two substrate additives were selected for analysis. Coir (Oldcastle; Anderson, SC) material was

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W. Garrett Owen, Brian E. Jackson, Brian E. Whipker, and William C. Fonteno

agricultural, municipal, or waste by-products. Numerous studies have investigated a variety of substitutes for peat, PB, and perlite such as cotton gin waste ( Owings, 1993 ), wood by-products ( Chong and Lumis, 2000 ; Criley and Watanabe, 1974 ), municipal