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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt, Lisa J. Rowland, Elizabeth L. Ogden, and Bryan T. Vinyard

and midwestern United States as a result of its limited winterhardiness and rapid rate of deacclimation (loss of cold acclimation) once chilling requirements are satisfied (USDA hardiness zone 7). Along the Pacific coast, rabbiteye is limited by a lack

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Mahmoud Panjtandoust and David J. Wolyn

different levels of winterhardiness. The establishment of freezing tolerance in asparagus may be associated with physiological and biochemical changes including the production of cyroprotective compounds. Simple sugars such as sucrose and glucose can

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Neil Anderson, Peter Ascher, Esther Gesick, Lee Klossner, Neal Eash, Vincent Fritz, James Hebel, Stephen Poppe, Judith Reith-Rozelle, Roger Wagner, Susan Jacobson, David Wildung, and Patricia Johnson

(0% for St. Paul, MN in 2003) because of an open winter with little snowfall, low temperatures, and low soil moisture levels ( Table 2 ). All winter-hardy comparisons that year also had 0% winter survival because of the harsh winter conditions

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Rajeev Arora and Lisa J. Rowland

; Warren, 1998 ). WINTER-HARDINESS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: IMPORTANCE OF DEACCLIMATION RESISTANCE AND REACCLIMATION ABILITY For winter survival, woody perennials not only must acclimate to cold, but also must resist premature deacclimation as a result of

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Neil O. Anderson, Esther Gesick, Peter D. Ascher, Steven Poppe, Shengrui Yao, David Wildung, Patricia Johnson, Vincent Fritz, Charlie Rohwer, Lee Klossner, Neal Eash, Barbara E. Liedl, and Judith Reith-Rozelle

’, respectively, and RHS 70B with white underlay and RHS N74D, white toward base for said petal surfaces in Mammoth™ ‘Dark Pink Daisy’ ( Strauss for the Regents of the University of Minnesota, 2011 ). Winterhardiness of Mammoth™ ‘Twilight Pink Daisy’ is a USDA Z3b

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Dariusz P. Malinowski, Robert S. Brown, and William E. Pinchak

Winter-hardy hibiscuses are herbaceous perennials in the mallow (Malvaceae) family that belong to six species native to the United States: H. coccineus Walter (scarlet rose mallow), H. dasycalyx S.F Blake and Shiller (Neches River rose mallow

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Dariusz P. Malinowski, Robert S. Brown, and William E. Pinchak

Winter-hardy hibiscuses are herbaceous, shrub-like perennials in the mallow (Malvaceae) family that belong to six species native to the United States and southern Canada ( Lawton, 2004 ; Winters, 1970 ). They grow naturally in marshy habitats

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Neil O. Anderson, Peter D. Ascher, Vincent Fritz, Charlie Rohwer, Steven Poppe, Shengrui Yao, Patricia Johnson, Lee Klossner, Neal S. Eash, Barbara E. Liedl, and Judith Reith-Rozelle

A new garden chrysanthemum with the shrub plant habit has been developed by the public sector University of Minnesota Flower Breeding and Genetics program. The program is well known for introducing trendsetting plant traits (winterhardiness, frost

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Becky R. Hughes and Adam Dale

Four winter-hardy strawberry selections and three cultivars where planted in northern Ontario in 2003 in a split-split plot trial where half the rows were mulched and half were left uncovered for the winter. Within each split plot, half the rows were sprayed for tarnished plant bugs and half were not. Yield and tarnish plant bug damage data was collected for two picking years. Two selections maintained their yields in the unmulched plots compared to the mulched plots. Yield for one of these selections was higher in the unmulched plots the first picking year and equal to the mulched plots in the second year. The remaining cultivars and selections produced less when not mulched for the winter. Except for the two selections that maintained their yields in the unmulched plots, plots where straw was applied for the winter had less tarnish plant bug damage. When the plots were sprayed for tarnish plant bugs, damage was reduced for most but not all selections and cultivars.

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Cecil T. Pounders

Winter-hardy hibiscuses are herbaceous perennials that regenerate from root buds each spring in USDA hardiness zones 5 through 9. Colloquially known as Rose Mallows, the most recent taxonomic revision ( Blanchard, 1976 ) recognizes five species