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Xiaohui Lin, Hongbo Li, Shenggen He, Zhenpei Pang, Shuqin Lin, and Hongmei Li

flowers, including carnations, are the result of stomatal water loss that gradually exceeds the rate of water uptake through the xylem vessels in the cut-stem ends ( Mattos et al., 2017 ; van Doorn, 2012 ). The stomata of higher plants occur mainly on the

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Peitao Lü, Xinmin Huang, Hongmei Li, Jiping Liu, Shenggen He, Daryl C. Joyce, and Zhaoqi Zhang

Termination of vase life for cut flowers is characterized by wilting associated with an imbalance developing between water uptake through xylem conduits in stems and water loss through stomata and other structures on leaves and other organs. To

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Nihal C. Rajapakse and John W. Kelly

Transpiration rates of chrysanthemum [Dendranthema ×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura] plants grown under spectral filters were evaluated as part of an investigation on using light quality to regulate plant growth. The 6% CuSO4·5H2O spectral filter reduced photosynthetic photon flux density in red (R) and far red (FR) wavelengths and increased the R: FR and blue (B): R ratios (B = 400 to 500 nm; R = 600 to 700 nm; FR = 700 to 800 nm) of transmitted light relative to the water (control) filter. After 28 days, cumulative water use of plants grown under CuSO4 filters was ≈37% less than that of control plants. Transpiration rates were similar among plants grown under CuSO4 and control filters when expressed as leaf area, a result suggesting that the reduced cumulative water loss was a result of smaller plant size. Plants grown under CuSO4 filters had slightly lower (10%) stomatal density than control plants. Light transmitted through CuSO4 filters did not alter the size of individual stomata; however, total number of stomata and total stomatal pore area per plant was ≈50% less in plants grown under CuSO4 filters than in those grown under control filters due to less leaf area. The results suggest that altering light quality may help reduce water use and fertilizer demands while controlling growth during greenhouse production.

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Margaret Landrigan, Stephen C. Morris, and Barry W. McGlasson

Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) rapidly lose their attractive appearance after harvest due to a superficial pericarp browning. Storage at high humidity minimizes fruit desiccation and may, therefore, delay browning onset. This paper examines the effect of reduced water loss rate on browning that may occur with time. Rambutan fruit pericarp browning beyond a commercially saleable level occurred at a weight loss of 25% to 40%. This depended on duration and storage relative humidity (RH). Skin browning was 50% greater on the red (R 134) than the yellow (R 156) cultivar at 60% RH. There was a storage time × RH interaction in the development of browning such that browning was observed earlier at lower RHs. Skin browning and spintern (soft spine) browning developed independently. Cracks appeared on the surface of fruit with increased weight loss. Browning occurrence was consistent with increased total phenolic compound levels in the pericarp. Water loss precedes browning occurrence and, over time, water loss is related to browning. Water stress appeared to affect rambutan pericarp tissue in much the same manner as senescence.

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Thayne Montague*

Granier style thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been used to estimate whole plant water loss on a variety of tree and vine species. However, studies using TDPs to investigate water loss of landscape tree species is rare. This research compared containerized tree water loss estimates of three landscape tree species using TDPs with containerized tree water loss estimates as measured by load cells. Over a three-year period, established, 5.0 cm caliper Bradford pear (Pyrus calleryana `Bradford'), English oak (Quercus robar), and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua `Rotundiloba') trees in 75 L containers were placed on load cells, and water loss was measured for a 60-d period. One 3.0 cm TDP was placed into the north side of each trunk 30 cm above soil level. To reduce evaporation, container growing media was covered with plastic. Each night, plants were irrigated to soil field capacity and allowed to drain. To provide thermal insulation TDPs and tree trunks (up to 30 cm) were covered with aluminum foil coated bubble wrap. Hourly TDP water loss estimates for each species over a three-day period indicate TDP estimated water loss followed a similar trend as load cell estimated water loss. However, TDP estimates were generally less, especially during peak transpiration periods. In addition, mean, total daily water loss estimates for each species was less for TDP estimated water loss when compared to load cell estimated water loss. Although TDP estimated water loss has been verified for several plant species, these data suggest potential errors can arise when using TDPs to estimate water loss of select landscape tree species. Additional work is likely needed to confirm estimated sap flow using TDPs for many tree species.

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N.K Lownds, M.G. White, and R.D. Berghage

Previous work has shown that container grown landscape plants use, and likely need, much less water than is typically applied. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify the relationships between water loss and water stress responses using several drought tolerant (Cassia corymbosa, Leucophyllum frutescens, Salvia greggii) and traditional landscape plants (Euonymus japonicus, Pyracantha coccinea). Water stress was induced by withholding water and water loss measured gravimetrically. The shape of the water loss curve was similar for all species being, Y = a + bx + cx2 (r2 > 0.95). The rate of ethylene production began to increase 24 hr after irrigation, reaching a maximum 36-48 hr after irrigation and then decreasing. Maximum ethylene production occured at 35-47% water loss irrespective of species or rate of water loss. Stress symptoms (wilting leaf discoloration and abscission) followed a similar pattern. The potential for monitoring gravimetric water loss to schedule container irrigation will be discussed.

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N.K Lownds, M.G. White, and R.D. Berghage

Previous work has shown that container grown landscape plants use, and likely need, much less water than is typically applied. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify the relationships between water loss and water stress responses using several drought tolerant (Cassia corymbosa, Leucophyllum frutescens, Salvia greggii) and traditional landscape plants (Euonymus japonicus, Pyracantha coccinea). Water stress was induced by withholding water and water loss measured gravimetrically. The shape of the water loss curve was similar for all species being, Y = a + bx + cx2 (r2 > 0.95). The rate of ethylene production began to increase 24 hr after irrigation, reaching a maximum 36-48 hr after irrigation and then decreasing. Maximum ethylene production occured at 35-47% water loss irrespective of species or rate of water loss. Stress symptoms (wilting leaf discoloration and abscission) followed a similar pattern. The potential for monitoring gravimetric water loss to schedule container irrigation will be discussed.

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N.K. Lownds, M. Banaras, and P.W. Bosland

Nine pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum L.) representing five pepper types were studied to determine water-loss rates, flaccidity, color, and disease development when stored at 8,14, or 20C for 14 days. Water-loss rate was markedly higher at 14C than at 8C, and was somewhat lower at 20C than at 14C. There were significant differences in water-loss rates between pepper cultivar with `NuMex R Naky', `NuMex Conquistador', and `New Mexico 6-4' (New Mexican-type peppers) having the highest water-loss rates. Flaccidity followed a pattern similar to water loss at each storage temperature, suggesting a direct relationship. Color development was cultivar- and package-dependent, and ratings increased with temperature. Placing pepper fruit in perforated polyethylene packages reduced water-loss rates 20 times or more, so that water loss no longer limited postharvest storage. Packaging also eliminated flaccidity and reduced color development across cultivars at 14 and 20C. Packaged fruit, however, developed diseases that limited postharvest longevity.

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N.K. Lownds, M. Banaras, and P.W. Bosland

Physical characteristics [initial water content, surface area, surface area: volume (SA: V) ratio, cuticle weight, epicuticular wax content, and surface morphology] were examined to determine relationships between physical properties and water-loss `rate in pepper fruits. `Keystone', `NuMex R Naky', and `Santa Fe Grande' peppers, differing in physical characteristics, were stored at 8, 14, or 20C. Water-loss rate increased linearly with storage time at each temperature and was different for each cultivar. Water-loss rate was positively correlated with initial water content at 14 and 20C, SA: V ratio at all temperatures, and cuticle thickness at 14 and 20C. Water-loss rate was negatively correlated with surface area and epicuticular wax content at all temperatures. Stomata were absent on the fruit surface, and epicuticular wax was amorphous for each cultivar.

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Dennis P. Stimart and Kenneth R. Schroeder

Cut flowers of a short(S) lived (3 days) inbred, a long(L) lived (15 days) inbred and their hybrid (F1, 7.3 days) of Antirrhinum majus L. were evaluated for water loss when held in deionized water under continuous fluorescent light at 25°C. Flowering stems for water loss evaluation were harvested when the basal five to six florets expanded. Cut stems were placed in narrowed-necked bottles with the open area between the stem and bottle sealed with Parafilm. Stem weight and water weight in the bottle were taken every 24 h. Water loss evaluation was continued until 50% of the open florets on the flowering stem wilted or turned brown. Overall, water loss from all accessions was highest 24 h postharvest, declined rapidly between 24 to 96 h, and remained unchanged throughout the remainder of postharvest life. Between 24 to 96 h, the slope of the line for water loss was greatest for L, least for S, and intermediate for the F1. It appears that longest postharvest life of A. majus is associated with the most rapid decline of water loss immediately postharvest to a level, which remains constant.