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Samuel Contreras, Mark A. Bennett and David Tay

treatments ( Table 2 ). The water productivity (seed yield per unit of water used; Oweis and Hachum, 2006 ) was 50% higher ( P = 0.01) for plants from the dry treatment ( Table 2 ). As observed in Expt. 1, seed germinability was similar for both treatments

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Chiara Cirillo, Youssef Rouphael, Rosanna Caputo, Giampaolo Raimondi and Stefania De Pascale

genotypes grown in two different shapes. For these reasons, the evaluation of DI as a possible technique to improve water productivity and the selection of genotypes that can better withstand soil water deficits are essential for sustainable production. The

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Khalid F. Almutairi, David R. Bryla and Bernadine C. Strik

Drought and mandatory water restrictions are limiting the availability of irrigation water in many important blueberry growing regions, such as Oregon, Washington, and California. New strategies are needed to maintain yield and fruit quality with less water. To address the issue, three potential options for reducing water use, including deficit irrigation, irrigation cutoffs, and crop thinning, were evaluated for 2 years in a mature planting of northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. ‘Elliott’). Treatments consisted of no thinning and 50% crop removal in combination with either full irrigation at 100% of estimated crop evapotranspiration (ETc), deficit irrigation at 50% ETc (applied for the entire growing season), or full irrigation with irrigation cutoff for 4–6 weeks during early (early- to late-green fruit) or late (fruit coloring to harvest) stages of fruit development. Stem water potential was similar with full and deficit irrigation but, regardless of crop thinning, declined by 0.5–0.6 MPa when irrigation was cutoff early and by >2.0 MPa when irrigation was cutoff late. In one or both years, the fruiting season was advanced with either deficit irrigation or late cutoff, whereas cutting off irrigation early delayed the season. Yield was unaffected by deficit irrigation in plants with a full crop load but was reduced by an average of 35% when irrigation was cutoff late each year. Cutting off irrigation early likewise reduced yield, but only in the 2nd year when the plants were not thinned; however, early cutoff also reduced fruit soluble solids and berry weight by 7% to 24% compared with full irrigation. Cutting off irrigation late produced the smallest and firmest fruit with the highest soluble solids and total acidity among the treatments, as well as the slowest rate of fruit loss in cold storage. Deficit irrigation had the least effect on fruit quality and, based on these results, appears to be the most viable option for maintaining yield with less water in northern highbush blueberry. Relative to full irrigation, the practice reduced water use by 2.5 ML·ha−1 per season.

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Xiang Cao, Darrell Bosch and James Pease

concerns, some nurseries have adopted WRT, which involves capturing and recycling irrigation water to improve crop water productivity and to enhance water supply security while reducing contaminants lost from nursery and greenhouse production sites. It is

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Dalong Zhang, Yuping Liu, Yang Li, Lijie Qin, Jun Li and Fei Xu

applied for crop production as a result of the reduced water supply without a significant yield reduction ( Gheysari et al., 2017 ; Kang and Zhang, 2004 ; Yang et al., 2017 ). Although atmospheric VPD mediates water flow and constrains water productivity

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Laurence Gendron, Guillaume Létourneau, Julien Cormier, Claire Depardieu, Carole Boily, Raymond Levallois and Jean Caron

strawberry growers to adopt appropriate irrigation scheduling methods to optimize plant growth, yields, and crop water productivity. Irrigation management studies have been conducted on a wide range of crops, soil types and climatic conditions. In drip

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Kylara A. Papenfuss and Brent L. Black

manage their water more effectively in an attempt to maximize water productivity. Water productivity ( Fereres and Soriano, 2007 ) is the crop yield or net income per unit of water used in crop evapotranspiration (ET c ). Under drought conditions

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test positive for downy mildew. Pulsed Drip Irrigation for Strawberries There is a critical need for growers to improve crop water productivity, particularly in highly permeable soils, and pulsed drip irrigation appears to be one solution. In a 3-year

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Tuan Anh Le, Zoltán Pék, Sándor Takács, András Neményi, Hussein G. Daood and Lajos Helyes

applied through drip irrigation for yield, quality, and water productivity of processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Hort. Environ. Biotechnol. 55 103 114 Lei, S. Yunzhou, Q. Fengchao, J. Changhai, S. Chao, Y. Yuxin, L. Mengyu, L. Baodi, D. 2009

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André Pereira and Nilson Villa Nova

’, Universidade de São Paulo MSc Diss. Bowen, W.T. 2003 Water productivity and potato cultivation 229 238 Kijne J.W. Barker R. Molden D. Water productivity in agriculture: Limits and opportunities for