Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,116 items for :

Clear All
Full access

Hilary A. Sandler

Cranberries are low-growing, trailing, woody vines that, once planted into a commercial setting, could stay in production for more than 25 years. During the productive life of the planting, the vine canopy can become degraded (e.g., too thick to

Full access

Lindsay M. Jordan, Thomas Björkman and Justine E. Vanden Heuvel

Traditionally, the soil directly beneath vines in wine grape vineyards is kept vegetation free to eliminate competition for water and nutrients. In the northeastern United States, bare soil is typically maintained beneath vines in vineyards with

Full access

Justine E. Vanden Heuvel, Steven D. Lerch, Celine Coquard Lenerz, James M. Meyers and Anna Katharine Mansfield

‘Noiret’, an interspecific red hybrid winegrape released by Cornell University in 2006, produces varietal wines with moderate tannin structure that lack hybrid character ( Reisch et al., 2006 ). Vine growth habit was originally described as

Free access

Tao Wu and Jiashu Cao

). In a comparison of the total peroxidase activities and isozyme patterns between the bush and vine types of Cucurbita pepo L. and Cucurbita maxima Duchesne (squash), Cucumis melo L. (muskmelon), and Citrullus vulgaris Shrad. (watermelon), Loy

Full access

Matthew W. Fidelibus, L. Peter Christensen, Donald G. Katayama and David W. Ramming

California produces 30% to 40% of the world's raisins ( Christensen, 2000a ). Most growers still rely on hand labor to pick the grapes and place them on paper trays, between the vine rows, to dry. However, in recent years, farm labor has become less

Free access

Linda M. Boyd and Andrew M. Barnett

Kiwifruit growers need to consistently produce high yields of kiwifruit with high DMC to meet consumer preferences for fruit with intense flavor and sweetness ( Harker et al., 2009 ) without compromising storage quality. Mature kiwifruit vines

Free access

Fan Zhang, Zi Wei, Peter Jeranyama, Carolyn DeMoranville and Harvey J.M. Hou

, which can be harmful to plants, including cranberry ( Bailey and Grossman, 2008 ; Kramer, 2010 ; Takahashi and Murata, 2008 ; Vener, 2007 ). Cranberry growers have observed yellow vine syndrome in the cranberry bog under normal light conditions, which

Full access

Amy L. Shober, Kimberly A. Moore, Gitta S. Hasing, Christine Wiese, Geoffrey C. Denny and Gary W. Knox

whether landscape-grown vines and groundcovers will require N fertilizer inputs as common annuals, perennials, or shrubs. Most research evaluating vine or groundcover response to N fertilizer rate was conducted in a nursery production ( Berberich et al

Free access

Zi Wei, Peter Jeranyama, Fan Zhang, Carolyn DeMoranville and Harvey J.M. Hou

al., 2002 ), and relative humidity ( Forney et al., 2009 ). Yellow vine symptoms are often observed in cranberry bogs under natural sunlight conditions, which produces yellow color along the leaf margins, whereas the area along the vein remains

Full access

Hilary A. Sandler and Carolyn J. DeMoranville

Cranberry beds typically are planted by using unrooted vines that are pressed directly into the soil using a disc with multiple rotating heads. Once planted, beds are maintained in production for at least 20 years. The development of new cultivars