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James D. Frantz, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael P. Hoffmann, and Molly M. Jahn

part by the Cornell University Vegetable Breeding Institute and USDA IFAFS Award No. 2001-52100-11347.

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James D. Frantz, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael P. Hoffmann, and Molly M. Jahn

Development Center for cotton aphid resistant germplasm. This study was funded in part by the Cornell University Vegetable Breeding Institute, a consortium of companies that support plant breeding research at Cornell, along with funding from USDA IFAFS Award

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J.R. Baggett and D. Kean

Inheritance of a twisted pod characteristic, in which bean pods develop with a twist that sometimes exceeds 360°, was studied in crosses between round-podded green bean cultivars. In crosses between `Oregon 91G' (normal) or `Oregon 54' (normal) and OSU 5256-1 (twisted), the F1 was normal. Segregation in F2 populations, tested over a 4-year period and including 4,995 plants, clearly fit a 3 normal: 1 twisted ratio. All plants of backcrosses of the F, to the normal parent were normal and backcrosses of the F1 to the twisted parent segregated 1 normal: 1 twisted. The ratios observed indicated that twisted pods are conditioned by a single recessive gene for which the symbol tw is proposed.

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Lauren Brzozowski, William L. Holdsworth, and Michael Mazourek

The Cornell University vegetable breeding program has developed cucumbers ( Cucumis sativus L.) resistant to a spectrum of diseases, including powdery mildew ( Cavatorta et al., 2012 ; Jahn et al., 2002 ) and viruses ( Munger, 1993 ). The program

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Mark W. Farnham and Michael A. Grusak

economic and quality traits. Vegetable breeding has always been a balancing act in which breeders have tried to combine attributes like host plant resistance to disease with yield and vegetable quality, all at the same time. Most improvements made in the

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Todd C. Wehner, Samuel F. Jenkins Jr., and Richard L. Lower

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Richard L. Lower, Todd C. Wehner, and Samuel F. Jenkins Jr.

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Bong-kyoo Kim, Don R. La Bonte, Christopher A. Clark, and Mario I. Buteler

Narrow-sense heritabilities for reaction to chlorotic leaf distortion (CLD), incited by Fusarium lateritium Nees: Fr., were estimated in sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] by variance component analysis and parent–offspring regression. Visually rated severity reactions to CLD varied greatly among the 20 parents used to generate half-sib progeny from open-pollinated nurseries in 1990 and 1991. Progeny from each nursery were evaluated along with parents in a completely randomized design in two consecutive years. Narrow-sense heritability (h 2) estimates based on variance components were moderate on an entry mean basis at 0.61 in 1990, 0.38 in 1991, and 0.33 for the two years combined. Slightly higher, but still moderate, estimates were obtained on an individual plant basis. Narrow-sense heritability estimates using parent–offspring regression were 0.35 in 1990, 0.33 in 1991, and 0.33 for the two years combined. Predicted next-generation response was highest using a half-sib family recurrent selection among three schemes compared at a 10% selection intensity. Our data indicate –0.63 improvement in the half-sib family CLD severity rating in one breeding cycle.

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Mau-Wei Lin, James F. Watson, and James R. Baggett

Analysis of parents and progeny generations of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) crosses among parents with differing content of soluble solids (SS) and pyruvic acid (PA) showed that SS and PA are expressed and inherited in a quantitative manner. Distribution of SS and PA in both parents and progenies covered a range of values. Generation means, frequency distributions, deviation from midparent value, and estimates of gene effects all indicated that inheritance of SS and PA was additive, except for small deviations from the additive hypothesis in several individual backcrosses. Estimates of broad-sense heritability ranged from 48% to 53% for PA and 8 % to 56 % for SS. Phenotypic correlations between PA and SS estimated from the F2 generations of two crosses, were moderate and positive (r = 0.50 and 0.42).