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Geoffrey C. Denny and Michael A. Arnold

). However, according to Watson (1983) it has also been treated as a botanical variety, T. distichum var. mexicanum Gordon. DNA and phytochemical analyses are not available for montezuma cypress. However, there are several factors that suggest botanical

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Lijing Zhou, David L. Creech, Ken W. Krauss, Yin Yunlong, and David L. Kulhavy

. imbricarium (Nutt.) Croom [pondcypress (PC)]; and Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum Gordon (MC). There has been considerable work in China that has involved controlled crosses between BC, MC, and PC, and the subsequent selection of superior genotypes that

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Geoffrey C. Denny, Michael A. Arnold, and Wayne A. Mackay

numeral is unique to an open-pollinated family from a given geographic area. The final letter indicates the taxonomic variety. ‘M’ indicates that the open-pollinated family belongs to T. distichum var. mexicanum , ‘D’ indicates T. distichum var

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Garry Vernon McDonald, Geoffrey C. Denny, Michael A. Arnold, Donita L. Bryan, and Larry Barnes

. Currently, there are three recognized botanical varieties of taxodium, including Taxodium distichum var. distichum with a wide North America geographical distribution, T . distichum var. mexicanum , which is restricted to Mexico and south Texas with

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Geoffrey C. Denny* and Michael A. Arnold

An experiment was initiated to evaluate the effects of previously recommended seed treatments for baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.] or pondcypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. var. imbricarium (Nutt.) Croom] on Montezuma cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. var. mexicanum Gordon], and to determine which, if any, provided optimum germination. Factorial combinations of seed treatments and stratification (2 °C for 0, 45, or 90 d) were applied to seeds of Montezuma cypress. Treatments included: 1) 90% ethanol 5 min soak, 2) ethyl ether 5 min soak, 3) 100 mg·L-1 citric acid 48 h soak, 4) mechanical scarification, 5) five hot water baths (42 °C) allowing the water to cool to room temperature between baths, and 6) a non-treated control. Three more seed treatments consisted of water soaks at room temperature (25 °C) for 0, 45, or 90 d. Seeds were germinated on moist filter paper in a growth chamber with a 12-h day/night photoperiod at a constant 25 °C. Data was collected daily for 14 d and then weekly for the following 4 wks. Radicle elongation of 1 cm was considered germination. Without stratification, 100 mg·L-1 citric acid and the hot water bath treatments were significantly different from other treatments by 7 d, though not from each other, with a mean cumulative germination of 15.6% and 12.2%, respectively. By 14 d, the 100 mg·L-1 citric acid treatment differed only from the ethyl ether wash attaining 28.9% and 14.4% germination, respectively. There were no other statistically significant differences observed among any other treatments without stratification. Germination percentages were low,<30%, without stratification. Effects of additional stratification will also be discussed.

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Andrew R. King, Michael A. Arnold, Douglas F. Welsh, and W. Todd Watson

[ Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum (Carrière) Gordon] ( Denny and Arnold, 2007 ). With the inclusion of these varieties, the native range of Taxodium extends from the east coast of the United States to central Texas and south into Mexico ( Denny and

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Andrew R. King, Michael A. Arnold, Douglas F. Welsh, and W. Todd Watson

var. mexicanum (Carrière) Gordon]. Cuttings were incision-wounded (1-cm basal cut along the vertical axis) or not. One experiment included a wounding treatment that did not significantly affect ( P ≤ 0.05) rooting percentage or root density ranking

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Qin Shi, Yunlong Yin, Zhiquan Wang, Wencai Fan, and Jianfeng Hua

distichum (L.), Taxodium ascendens , Taxodium mucronatum ( Tsumura et al., 1999 ). However, recent nomenclature places Taxodium as one species with three genotypes: T . distichum Rich. var. distichum (baldcypress-BC), T . distichum var

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Montezuma cypress, Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum (Carriere Gordon), selected for growth rate, lack of knees, salt/alkalinity tolerance and a tendency to be evergreen in mild climates. A split block design was utilized with 2 genotypes, 4 salinity

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of Taxodium were evaluated for salinity tolerance: baldcypress ( Taxodium distichum var. distichum ), montezuma cypress ( Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum ), and Taxodium distichum ‘Nanjing Beauty’ (a hybrid between baldcypress and montezuma