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Yi-Chen Chen, Wei-Chun Chang, San-Tai Wang, and Shu-I Lin

methods have been developed for different vegetables, such as cleft grafting, tongue approach grafting, hole insertion grafting, and splice grafting ( Lee, 1994 ; Lee and Oda, 2010 ; Lee et al., 2010 ; Oda, 2007 ). Among these techniques, tube grafting

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Sarah A. Masterson, Megan M. Kennelly, Rhonda R. Janke, and Cary L. Rivard

, which is a significant barrier in the adoption of grafting in the United States. The most popular grafting method for tomato is the tube-grafting technique (also known as splice grafting or Japanese top grafting) due to its efficiency and simplicity

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Sarah A. Masterson, Megan M. Kennelly, Rhonda R. Janke, and Cary L. Rivard

that had a history of soilborne disease epidemics. In all trials, a nongrafted control treatment was included as a standard comparison. All grafted treatments were grafted using the tube-grafting technique also known as splice grafting ( Bumgarner and

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crops, but not for cabbage. Chen et al. (p. 57) developed a grafting method and identified the best healing conditions (temperature 20 °C, relative humidity 95%, light intensity 79-107 µmol·m -2 ·s -1 ) for grafted cabbage seedlings. Using tube

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Chieri Kubota, Michael A. McClure, Nancy Kokalis-Burelle, Michael G. Bausher, and Erin N. Rosskopf

. Grafted tomato seedling production and use. In most propagation operations in North America, grafting of tomato is accomplished by using an elastic plastic tube that holds the graft union cut at an angle (so-called ”tube grafting method”). Each plastic

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Cary L. Rivard, Olha Sydorovych, Suzanne O'Connell, Mary M. Peet, and Frank J. Louws

plant sales ( Rivard and Louws, 2006 ). The most common tomato grafting technique for commercial propagation worldwide is tube grafting ( Oda, 1999 ; Rivard and Louws, 2006 ). This technique is highly effective and can be performed when the plants are

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Hira Singh, Pradeep Kumar, Sushila Chaudhari, and Menahem Edelstein

-grafting environmental conditions for proper healing and acclimatization are very important for the production of grafted plants ( Lee, 1994 ). The commonly used grafting methods in tomato are tube and cleft grafting ( Lee and Oda, 2003 ); however, tube grafting (also

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Cary L. Rivard and Frank J. Louws

stress ( Abdelmageed et al., 2004 ), and excessive soil moisture ( Black et al., 2003 ). There are a variety of techniques to graft tomatoes ( Lee, 2003 ). Tube grafting has been adopted as the commercial method for tomato grafting worldwide as a result

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Hanna Y. Hanna

early December. All three cultivars were grafted using the tube grafting technique described by McAvoy (2005) . The 3-week-old ‘Maxifort’ seedlings were cut at an angle below the cotyledon leaves and the tops were discarded. ‘Geronimo’, ‘Quest’, and

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Charles E. Barrett, Xin Zhao, and Robert McSorley

scion seeds on 16 Feb. 2010 and 11 Feb. 2011. Seedlings were grown in Fafard Organic Formula Custom potting mix (Apopka, FL) using 128-cell-count Speedling Flats (Sun City, FL). At the four to five true leaf stage, seedlings were tube-grafted. Grafting