Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 128 items for :

  • "triazoles" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Steven A. Altman and Theophanes Solomos

Continuous postharvest treatment of carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus L. cv. Elliot's White) with 50 or 100 mM aminotriazole significantly extended useful vase life relative to flowers held in distilled H2O. No morphological changes symptomatic of floral senescence appeared in treated flowers until 12 to 15 days after harvest. The longevity of aminotriazole-treated flowers was extended to ≈18 days. The respiratory rate of aminotriazole-treated carnations was suppressed, and they exhibited no respiratory climacteric throughout the period of observation. The responsiveness of aminotriazole-treated flowers to exogenous ethylene appeared temporally regulated. Flowers treated with 50 mM aminotriazole for 2 days senesced in response to application of 10 μl exogenous ethylene/liter, whereas flowers treated for 24 days exhibited no morphological response to ethylene treatment. Chemical name used: 3-1H-amino-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl (aminotriazole).

Free access

David A Gilbertz

Seven to 9 cvs each of Begonia semperflorens, Tagetes erecta, T. patula, and Petunia hybrida (grandiflora and multiflora types) were sown into seedling trays. One to 3 weeks after transplanting to flats (75 cm3/cell), paclobutrazol (PB) was sprayed at concentrations of 10 (begonia), 60 (marigold) or 100 (petunia) mg liter-1 at a 200 ml m-2 rate. Uniconazole (UC) was applied at one-half the PB concentrations. Plant height was measured before planting in the field May 17 and monthly through July. Species were analyzed separately and generally, there were no cultivar by triazole interactions. During the greenhouse phase, the triazoles controlled height of both marigold species compared to control, but in July the PB and UC treated plants were 100 and 91%, respectively, of control plant height. Flowering was delayed up to 4 days for UC treated T. patula plants. Height of triazole-treated petunias was 60-67% of control height during the greenhouse phase and 84-95% after 2 months in the field. Begonia height was reduced by triazoles during both phases. After 2 months in the field, PB and UC treated begonias were 72 and 44%, respectively, of control plant height.

Free access

Steven A. Altman and Theophanes Solomos

Sim-type carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus L., cv. Elliot's White) continuously treated with 50 mM or 100 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (amitrole) and held in the dark at 18°C did not exhibit a respiratory climacteric relative to dH2O-treated controls. No morphological changes symptomatic of floral senescence appeared in treated flowers until 12-15 days post-harvest. Other triazoles were not effective in prolonging senescence. Amitrole appears to inhibit ethylene biosynthesis by blocking the enzyme-mediated conversion of S-adenosyl-L-methionine to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Ethylene action appears to be progressively inhibited in that flowers held in treatment solution for 2 d or less responded to application of 10 uL/L exogenous ethylene whereas flowers held 10 d or longer exhibited no response. Electrophoretic resolution of total crude extracts evidenced protein synthesis as well as degradation. Western analysis and total activity assays showed an amitrole concentration-specific inhibition of catalase activity.

Free access

J.M. Goatley Jr. and R.E. Schmidt

This study was conducted to determine if foliar-applied biostimulators could enhance harvestability and transplanting of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) sod. The systemic triazole fungicides propiconazole at 42 mg·m-2 and triadimefon at 150 mg·m-2 enhanced post-transplant rooting and sod strength of bluegrass. Propiconazole had the best sod enhancement effect, increasing sod tensile strength 23% and increasing transplant root lift strength 64% across three experiments. The synthetic cytokinin benzyladenine (BA) at 6 mg·m-2 and seaweed extract (SWE, a freeze-dried extract of the seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum) at 0.3 ml product/m 2 had little effect. The response to triadimefon was intermediate. Foliar applications of chelated Fe phosphate citrate at 112 mg·m-2 did not enhance sod strength or rooting of Kentucky bluegrass when applied either alone or in combination with the biostimulator materials. Chemical names used: l-(2-(2,4 -dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-l,3-dioxo1an-2-ylmethyl)-lH-l,2,4-triazole(propiconazole);1-(4-chlorophenoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-lH-(l,2,4-triazo1-l-yl)-butanone (triadimefon);6-benzylaminopurine (BA, benzyladenine).

Free access

Aristidis S. Matsoukis, Ioannis Tsiros, and Athanasios Kamoutsis

The effect of various plant growth regulators on leaf area development of Lantana camara L. subsp. camara was investigated under three photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) conditions (100%, 72%, and 34% light transmittance). The triazole compounds paclobutrazol (0, 50, 100, 200, and 500 mg·L-1) and triapenthenol (175, 350, 700, and 1400 mg·L-1), as well as the onium-type compounds mepiquat chloride (125, 250, 500, and 1000 mg·L-1) and chlormequat chloride (750, 1500, 3000, and 6000 mg·L-1), were applied as foliar spray solutions in each PPF level after pinching the plants. Leaf area, in general, decreased logarithmically as the concentrations of paclobutrazol and triapenthenol increased at all PPF levels. On the other hand, PPF reduction was found to increase leaf area of lantana plants treated with all concentrations of each regulator. Leaf area reduction of the paclobutrazol and triapenthenol treated plants at all PPF levels exceeded 60% compared with that of nontreated plants. However, the corresponding reduction was 22%, up to 51% for the plants treated with mepiquat chloride and chlormequat chloride. These results indicate that the triazole compounds have a greater effect on the reduction of lantana leaf area than the onium-type compounds. Chemical names used: (2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4, 4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-yl) pentan-3-ol (paclobutrazol); (E)-(RS)-1-cyclohexyl-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-yl) pent-1-en-1-ol (triapenthenol); 1,1-dimethyl-piperidinium chloride (mepiquat chloride); (2-chloroethyl) trimethylammonium chloride (chlormequat chloride).

Free access

J.M. Goatley Jr. and R.E. Schmidt

This study was conducted to determine the potential anti-senescence activity of certain chemicals by monitoring changes in gross. CO2 exchange with senescence of excised leaves of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.). One day following foliar applications of benzyladenine (BA), triadimefon, and propiconazole, with and without chelated Fe (8% Fe phosphate citrate), Kentucky bluegrass leaves were excised, floated on distilled water in petri dishes, and placed in a darkened growth chamber. Gross CO2 exchange rates (CER) were recorded 1, 4, 7, and 10 days after excision (DAE). Foliar applications of Fe, BA, triadimefon, or propiconazole applied alone induced an anti-senescence response. Combinations of Fe with the chemicals delayed excision-induced leaf senescence, but no significant increase in anti-senescence activity was obtained from the Fe and chemical combinations as compared to the materials applied alone. Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (benzyladenine, BA); 1-(4-Chlorophenoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-1(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1yl)-2-butanone (triadimefon);1-[[2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole (propiconazole).

Full access

Gary J. Keever and Mark S. West

Uniconazole was applied once as a soil drench (15, 30, or 45 mg a.i./plant) or foliar spray (500, 1000, or 1500 mg liter-1, about 175 ml/plant) to established, field-grown thorny elaeagnus (Elaeagnus pungens Thunb. Fruitlandii) and leyland cypress [× Cupressocyparis leylandii (A.B. Jacks. & Dallim.) Dallim. & A.B. Jacks]. At the end of the second growing season following treatment, shoot dry weights (SDW) of thorny elaeagnus decreased with increasing rates of drench-applied uniconazole, while SDW of plants receiving the foliar application were not affected by increasing rates. Growth indices of leyland cypress, determined twice during the first growing season and at the end of the second growing season, were not influenced by application method or rate. Uniconazole applied as a soil drench at 15 to 45 mg a.i./plant suppressed growth of established thorny elaeagnus for at least two growing seasons, but leyland cypress was not affected by uniconazole drench or foliar spray at tested rates. No phytotoxicity was observed on either species in any treatment during the experiment.

Free access

Tim D. Davis, James E. Ells, and Ronald H. Walser

Seeds of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. UC 82L were treated with hypertonic priming solutions containing KNO3 and K3PO4(10 g·liter-1 each), and various concentrations of uniconazole before sowing. Treatment of the seed with priming solution only hastened emergence by ≈ 2 days compared to untreated seed sown directly from the packet, but did not affect total emergence after 12 days. Addition of uniconazole to the priming solution had no significant effect on speed of emergence or total emergence after 12 days compared to the primed control. Seed priming plus uniconazole at 1 or 10 mg·liter-1 reduced seedling height after 2 weeks by ≈ 20% compared to the primed control. Uniconazole had no effect on the mortality of either hardened or nonhardened seedlings exposed to below-freezing temperatures for 3 hr. These data suggest that treatment of tomato seed with hypertonic solutions containing uniconazole would be of little practical value in protecting seedlings from freeze damage. Chemical names used: (E)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-yl)penten-3-ol (uniconazole).

Free access

Tim D. Davis

Plugs of Zinnia elegans Jacq. `California Giant' and Tagetes erecta L. `Golden Climax' and `Grange Lady' were treated with foliar sprays of uniconazole solutions at 0, 5, 25, or 50 mg·liter-1 (spray volume = 120 ml·m-2). Ten days later individual plants were transplanted to OS-liter pots for evaluation of subsequent growth and flowering. All uniconazole treatments reduced height 10 days after application; the extent of reduction depended on uniconazole spray concentration. With zinnia, only the 50-mg·liter-1 foliar spray caused undesirable stunting for at least 1 month after transplanting. None of the uniconazole treatments affected time to anthesis for zinnia. With both marigold cultivars, all uniconazole treatments reduced growth the 2 weeks following transplanting. The highest concentration reduced marigold shoot growth during this period to 25% to 30% of untreated controls. Between 2 and 4 weeks after transplanting growth of all uniconazole-treated marigolds recovered to levels similar to the control. Time to anthesis was increased by the 50 mg·liter-1 treatment for both marigold cultivars. These results suggest that foliar sprays of uniconazole at 5 to 25 mg·liter-1 can control plug height during production without adversely affecting subsequent growth and flowering. with both zinnia and marigold, a single GA3 foliar spray of 100 mg·liter-1 at transplanting partially reversed the adverse post-production effects of the 50 mg·liter-1 uniconazole foliar spray.

Full access

Xiao-Juan Wei, Jinlin Ma, Kun Wang, Xiao-Jing Liang, Jin-Xuan Lan, Yue-Juan Li, Kai-Xiang Li, and Haiying Liang

·L –1 . PBZ [(2RS,3RS)-1(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentan-3-ol] is a triazole-type cytochrome P 450 inhibitor that is used extensively in horticulture as a plant growth retardant and fungicide. This growth regulator has been