Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "trait prioritization" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Chengyan Yue, Jingjing Wang, Eric Watkins, Stacy A. Bonos, Kristen C. Nelson, James A. Murphy, William A. Meyer and Brian P. Horgan

trait prioritization in turfgrass industry is market oriented. Turfgrass breeders, growers, distributors, and other parties in the supply chain could benefit from market studies on consumers who purchase turfgrass seeds and grasses. Our previous research

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James J. Luby, Alicia L. Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Nnadozie Oraguzie, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy Iezzoni

supply chain parties including producers, marketing intermediaries, and consumers. This study focuses specifically on producers’ trait prioritization and it is a part of a large project funded by U.S. Department of Agriculture “RosBREED: Enabling Marker

Free access

R. Karina Gallardo, Diem Nguyen, Vicki McCracken, Chengyan Yue, James Luby and James R. McFerson

Over 60 rosaceous crop breeding programs exist in North America, but no information has been available on which traits are targeted for selection or how breeders make such decisions. We surveyed all active rosaceous fruit breeding programs in the United States and Canada to determine: 1) the relative importance of over 50 plant traits that breeders select for 2) the likelihood of selection for the most important traits; and 3) the factors influencing breeders’ decisions. A double-bounded Tobit model was used to investigate the effect of supply chain parties, technical and socioeconomic challenges, and crop characteristics on the likelihood of selection for trait clusters. We found that consumer-driven forces positively impact the likelihood of selection for traits more than producer forces and a breeder’s own experience. Technical factors are as important as socioeconomic factors but less important than market-related factors. Our findings provide the first ever evidence that a socioeconomic approach in specialty crop breeding programs can contribute to an improved understanding of the effects of different supply chain factors on breeding programs’ trait priority setting.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James Luby, Alicia Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, David Bedford, Susan Brown, Kate Evans, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy F. Iezzoni

Systematic studies of the relative importance of apple traits for U.S. apple producers to inform U.S. apple breeding programs have been lacking. To fill this gap, a series of audience surveys with instant feedback at five apple producer meetings across the United States was conducted. The traits included in this study were fruit crispness, juiciness, firmness, flavor, soluble solids concentration, sugar–acid balance, shelf life at retail, freedom from storage disorders, host plant disease resistance, and other fruit and tree traits provided by the producer. Producers rated fruit flavor and crispness as the most important traits for a successful apple cultivar. The relative importance assigned to traits was associated with growing location and producers’ years of experience in the decision-making process of managing apple orchards. This study contributes directly to a larger effort that provides breeding programs with systematic knowledge of trait preferences of supply chain members, including producers, and should result in a more targeted approach to developing and commercializing new apple cultivars.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James J. Luby, Alicia L. Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Tom Gradziel, Ksenija Gasic, Gregory L. Reighard, John Clark and Amy Iezzoni

We conducted audience surveys at three major peach producer meetings across the United States. We found that the relative importance assigned to fruit quality and tree traits by producers varied across producers’ end markets. Fresh peach producers indicated fruit flavor and size were the most important fruit quality traits, whereas processed peach producers viewed fruit size, fruit firmness, and absence of split pits as being the most important traits for a successful peach cultivar. These results have potential to ensure that peach breeding programs are consonant with fresh and processed peach producers’ needs for fruit and tree traits.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James Luby, Alicia Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Vance M. Whitaker, Chad E. Finn, James F. Hancock, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy Iezzoni

The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the relative importance of strawberry fruit quality and plant traits to strawberry producers. Previous studies focus on strawberry traits that impact postharvest quality and marketable yield; however, studies emphasizing the importance of these traits to strawberry producers are scarce. To investigate U.S. strawberry producer trait preferences, a series of audience surveys were conducted at four strawberry producer meetings across the United States. Results indicate that fruit firmness, fruit flavor, and fruit shelf life at retail were the most important fruit/plant traits to producers for a successful strawberry cultivar to possess. Growing state and producers’ years involved in the decision-making process of strawberry farms impacted the relative importance of the fruit/plant traits. This study directly contributes to a larger investigation of supply chain members’ trait preferences to improve the efficiency of Rosaceae fruit crop breeding programs and to increase the likelihood of new cultivar adoption. The overall project should result in a more efficient approach to new strawberry cultivar development and commercialization.

Open access

Zongyu Li, R. Karina Gallardo, Wendy Hoashi-Erhardt, Vicki A. McCracken, Chengyan Yue and Lisa Wasko DeVetter

predisposition for breeders to be misaligned in their trait prioritization relative to growers. However, at the cluster level, the results from this survey work suggest that fruit quality and disease resistance/tolerance are more important relative to plant

Restricted access

Hayk Khachatryan and Alicia Rihn

615 Yue, C. Gallardo, K.R. Luby, J. Rihn, A.L. McFerson, J.R. McCracken, V. Bedford, D. Brown, S. Evans, K. Weebadde, C. Sebolt, A. Iezzoni, A.F. 2013 An investigation of U.S. apple producers’ trait prioritization - Evidence from audience surveys

Restricted access

Jong Woo Choi, Chengyan Yue, James Luby, Shuoli Zhao, Karina Gallardo, Vicki McCracken and Jim McFerson

market needs ( Capocasa et al., 2008 ; Hancock et al., 2008 ; Khanizadeh et al., 1992 ; Whitaker et al., 2011 ). Although these studies provided insight into breeders’ trait prioritization decisions, a systematic investigation that includes consumers

Free access

Mercy A. Olmstead, Jessica L. Gilbert, Thomas A. Colquhoun, David G. Clark, Robert Kluson and Howard R. Moskowitz

Publishing, Lenexa, KS Fresh Trends 2012 The packer. Vance Publishing, Lenexa, KS Gallardo, R.K. Nguyen, D. McCracken, V. Yue, C. Luby, J. McFerson, J.R. 2012 An investigation of trait prioritization in rosaceous fruit breeding programs HortScience 47 771 776