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Tom Barnicle and Karen Stoelzle Midden

This study investigated the effects of indoor horticulture activities on the current psychological well-being of older people in two long-term care facilities over a 7-week period. Thirty-one participants at one facility served as the control group. Thirty-one participants at another facility served as the horticulture group. Participants in both facilities continued with their normal daily routine and activities over the 7-week period; however, the horticulture group participated in a 1-hour horticulture activity session once a week over the 7-week period and the control group did not. The control group and horticulture group did not differ significantly in psychological well-being prior to the start of the study. After the 7-week program, the horticulture group had a significant increase in psychological well-being, whereas the control group had a slight decrease in psychological well-being. The results of this study indicate that horticulture activities may have a beneficial effect on the current psychological well-being of older people in a long-term care facility.

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Joel Flagler

It has been observed that the process of horticulture can help to heal physical, mental, and social disabilities. Professionally trained horticultural therapists prescribe and administer planting and gardening activities to provide benefits to people of all ages and abilities. Horticultural therapy programs are now commonplace in hospitals, geriatric centers, schools, rehabilitation facilities, community gardens and prisons. One common goal in all of these programs is to help heal, teach and retrain individuals through the use of plants.

As a result of repeated successes, horticulture is being widely accepted as an effective therapeutic tool. Research is underway to measure the effectiveness of horticultural therapy in clinical and correctional settings. Databases are being developed to document and substantiate the beneficial effects of horticulture on human well-being. With such research results we can better understand the value of horticultural therapy in the recovery and rehabilitation processes.

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Sin-Ae Park, Sae-Room Oh, Kwan-Suk Lee, and Ki-Cheol Son

.D. 2009 Physical and psychological health conditions of older adults classified as gardeners or nongardeners HortScience 44 206 210 Relf, D. 1973 Horticulture: A therapeutic tool J. Rehabil. 39 27 29 Restuccio, J.P. 1992 Fitness the dynamic gardening way

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Sin-Ae Park, Candice A. Shoemaker, and Mark D. Haub

Physical activity and the incidence of coronary heart disease Annu. Rev. Public Health 8 253 287 Relf, D. 1973 Horticulture: A therapeutic tool J. Rehabil. 39 27 29 Restuccio, J.P. 1992 Fitness the dynamic gardening way Balance of Nature Publishing Cordova

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Hui-Mei Chen, Hung-Ming Tu, and Chaang-Iuan Ho

satisfaction Leis. Stud. 12 61 70 Relf, P.D. 1973 Horticulture: A therapeutic tool J. Rehabil. 39 27 29 Relf, P.D. Lohr, V.I. 2003 Human issues in horticulture HortScience 38 984

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Choong-Ki Lee, Sin-Ae Park, James W. Mjelde, Tae-Kyun Kim, and Jae-Hwan Cho

407 Relf, D. 1973 Horticulture: A therapeutic tool J. Rehabil. 39 27 29 Relf, D. 1981 The use of horticulture in vocational rehabilitation J. Rehabil. 47 53 56 Restuccio, J