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Gary Y. Gao, James A. Chatfield, Erik A. Draper and Joseph F. Boggs

The Ohio State University (OSU) Extension Nursery, Landscape, and Turf Team (ENLTT) is an innovative and interdisciplinary team comprised of extension agents, extension specialists, researchers, teaching faculty, university arboretum staff, and research assistants. ENLTT has greatly improved the process of acquisition, delivery, and support of accurate, practical, and timely educational resources through interdisciplinary and industry partnerships. The award-winning weekly electronic newsletter Buckeye Yard and Garden Line (BYGL) has been the focal point of our teamwork since 1993. An ornamental research circular, authored and edited by ENLTT members, remains the most requested publication from the Section of Communication and Technology, Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center, OSU. Strong partnership with the green industry in Ohio has resulted in the financial commitment of more than $230,000 from the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association since 1993. ENLTT members have improved themselves as a result of educating each other through weekly BYGL conference calls from April to October, taking study tours, and conducting joint educational programs. Twenty-two commodity or issue teams, such as, Floriculture Team, Vegetable Crops Team, Tree Fruit Team, Forestry Team, Agronomic Crops Team, Sustainable Agriculture Team, and Dairy Team, have been formed in OSU Extension due to the success of ENLTT.

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John S. Caldwell and Marilyn S. Prehm

Twenty students from six disciplines in a farming systems course and in a human nutrition course were organized into four interdisciplinary teams during a joint laboratory. Through lectures, videotapes, and actual interviews of farm families, students were trained to work as a team collecting and processing information from informal interviews. Most students (63%) found the joint laboratory “very useful,” but 41% considered the overall work load excessive. Students rated achievement of team-related objectives significantly higher than course-related objectives. The actual interviewing of farm families was rated the most useful training technique. Student contributions to the team were more discipline-based than integrative, with 63% of the students contributing knowledge and skills from their own discipline. Students' gains from the team were more integrative, with 94% gaining from the team process, knowledge from other disciplines, and integration of disciplines, but only 31% gaining new knowledge or skills in their own disciplines.

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P. Diane Relf and R. Peter Madsen

Developing the Interdisciplinary Research Team of the Office of Consumer Horticulture has proven to be very effective at Virginia Tech. Established with the support of the Director of the Agricultural Research Station and the Dean of Research, the initial team was gathered based on their diverse fields and a common “interest” in plants. This core group consisted of three horticulturists, a landscape architect, a psychologist, a sociologist, and an Extension administrator. A campus-wide promotional mailing brought several new members. Members were also invited to join based on their human-factors research activities as reported in campus media. There are currently 19 members; they have actively pursued cooperative research projects to keep costs at a minimum. Members have conducted a 100-participant campus workshop as well as the national symposium, “The Role of Horticulture in Human Well-Being and Social Development,” and are currently working on ten research projects which will help develop methods and data valuable for learning about the effects of horticulture on human life quality.

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Genhua Niu, Raul I. Cabrera, Terri W. Starman and Charles R. Hall

salinity thresholds are needed. Nature of partnerships, alliances, brands, and initiatives Our team at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) System is addressing water quantity and quality issues and needs through cooperative research, teaching, and extension

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Mike Willett, T.J. Smith, A.B. Peterson, H. Hinman, R.G. Stevens, T. Ley, P. Tvergyak, K.M. Williams, K.M. Maib and J.W. Watson

In the mid-1980s, a statewide educational program was initiated to help improve productivity in replanted apple orchards. This effort began with a study of the background of the problem in Washington and an assessment of the problems growers faced when replanting orchards. An array of potential limiting factors were identified-most important, specific apple replant disease (SARD)-but also low soil pH, poor irrigation practices, arsenic (As) spray residues in the soil, soil compaction, nematodes, nutrient deficiencies, and selection of the appropriate orchard system. The educational program was delivered using a variety of methods to reach audience members with different learning styles and to provide various levels of technical information, focusing on ways to correct all limiting factors in replant situations. Results have been: Acceptance of soil fumigation as a management tool: increased recognition of soil physical, chemical, and moisture problems; reduced reliance on seedling rootstock, and an increase in the use of dwarfing, precocious understocks; and better apple tree growth and production in old apple orchard soils.

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Tara Baugher, Montserrat Fonseca Estrada, Kelly Lowery and Héctor Núñez Contreras

the theoretical framework for this project that was led by a bicultural team of Penn State Extension educators and specialists. Materials and methods During 2014–16, team members conducted and evaluated various formats of extension programming in

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S. Christopher Marble and Todd P. West

successfully establish extension impacts from these activities and resources. Four papers were presented from a multidisciplinary team representing different institutions in the southeastern United States. This team had valuable experience working as a group to

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Erin M. Silva and Geraldine Muller

interdisciplinary University team cooperating with broadly representative citizens, groups and local leaders in the Kickapoo Valley.” To remain true to this intent, the Farm Links program’s mission is to create a sustainable school-based program that supports

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Brian J. Pearson and Kimberly Moore

employment needs. The ability to communicate effectively, work within a team structure, solve complex problems, and organize and prioritize ranked high among industry needs. Despite a rigorous focus on discipline-oriented knowledge and skills, development of

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Jesús A. Gil-Ribes, Louise Ferguson, Sergio Castro-Garcia and Gregorio L. Blanco-Rodán

. Succeeding requires a multidisciplinary team, simultaneously investigating different aspects of harvester development and efficiency, orchard management, and final product quality. Finally, financing from the local industry, national, or international