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Greg D. Hoyt

A no-till sweetcorn strip-till tomato rotation was established to determine whether a grass or legume winter cover crop would provide greater summer mulch and more soil inorganic nitrogen from residue decomposition. Sweetcorn yields improved as N rate increased in rye residue and bare soil, but only increased at the 50 kg N/ha rate in vetch residue. Strip-till tomato yields improved with all N rates for all covers. Total soil N and C were greater in both the vetch and rye residue treatments than the bare soil. Fertilizer N addition did not affect changes in total N or C percentages. Greater soil nitrate was measured beneath vetch residue at spring planting than in the rye residue or bare soil surface.

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Vincent Russo and Aristotel Pappelis

Fungi can colonize senescent sweet corn (Zea mays var. rugosa Bonaf.) tissue. Senescence levels of tissues can be rated. Effects of four planting dates on senescence of standard (su, cv. Merit), and supersweet (sh2, cv. Florida Staysweet) corn at fresh market and seed harvest were determined. Stalk senescence was affected by cultivar (sh2 < su) and planting date (earliest was lowest). Shank senescence was affected by cultivar (fresh market < seed harvest) and planting date (lowest for plants of the earliest and latest plantings). Cob senescence was not affected by cultivar, slightly lower at fresh market than seed harvest, and lower for plants of the later than earlier planting dates. In a second experiment senescence was rated during development of sh2 cultivars. Formation of reproductive structures increased senescence rate. Cultivar had little effect on stalk and cob senescence at fresh market harvest. The cv. `Honey'n Pearl' had the lowest shank senescence rating. Delayed senescence should be incorporated in to corn genotypes.

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R.L. Parish, R.P. Bracy, and H.F. Morris Jr.

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of banding or broadcasting fertilizer on yield and quality of turnip (Brassica rapa L. Rapifera group), sweetcorn (Zea mays var. rugosa Bonaf.), and cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group). Preplant fertilizer was applied broadcast before bedding, broadcast after bedding, or banded after bedding. Sidedress applications were broadcast or banded on the beds. Differences in plant size and vigor were noticed early in the season in the spring turnip crop, with the growth in the broadcast-and-bed treatment appearing superior. The yield at first harvest and total yield were lower for turnip grown with the bed-and-broadcast treatment. No differences in yield of cabbage or sweetcorn resulted from the treatments. Few differences in turnip stem-to-leaf ratio were noted due to fertilizer treatment. Few differences in yield due to sidedress method were noted with any of the crops. Analysis of soil samples in a grid pattern across the beds showed that the location of the fertilizer after the broadcast-and-bed treatment was similar to the placement of the banded fertilizer. Since broadcasting can be done with a faster, wider applicator, growers could reduce costs by broadcasting fertilizer and obtain yields that are at least equivalent to the yields obtained by banding the fertilizer.

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Richard L. Parish, Regina P. Bracy, and Hershel F. Morris Jr.,

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of banding or broadcasting fertilizer on yield and quality of turnip (Brassica rapa L. Rapifera group), sweetcorn (Zea mays var. rugosa Bonaf), and cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group). Preplant fertilizer was applied broadcast prior to bedding, broadcast after bedding, or banded after bedding. Sidedress applications were broadcast or banded on the beds. Strong visual differences were noticed early in the season in the spring turnip crop with the growth in the broadcast-then-bed treatment appearing superior. The yield at first harvest and total yield were lower for turnip growth with the bed-and-broadcast treatments. No differences in yield of cabbage and sweetcorn resulted from the treatments. Few differences in turnip stem to leaf ratio were noted due to fertilizer treatment. Few differences in yield due to sidedress method were noted with any of the crops. Since broadcasting can be done with a faster, wider applicator, growers could reduce costs by broadcasting fertilizer and obtain yields that are at least equivalent to the yields from banding.

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J.K. Collins, P. Perkins-Veazie, E.V. Wann, and N. Maness

Supersweet corn with the shrunken-2 gene (sh2) has shown good quality after frozen storage. A study was undertaken to further evaluate the quality of supersweet corn (cv Florida Staysweet) unblanched or blanched then frozen. Samples were evaluated every 4 months for 12 months for peroxidase activity. sugar composition, water soluble polysaccharides and organoleptic qualities. Peroxidese activity changed in unblanched corn at each sampling date, which was consistently higher than in blanched corn. Sucrose and total sugars declined during storage. Sucrose was highest in blenched samples and reducing sugars were highest in unblanched samples. WSP content was low in all samples, but lower in blenched compared to unblanched samples. Taste panelists discerned differences between blanched and unblanched corn at 8 months when blanched samples were rated as more yellow than unblanched. However, no differences were found for taste between blanched and unblanched samples for taste at 12 months. These results indicate that sh2 sweetcorn maintained good eating quality for 12 months of frozen storage with or without blanching.

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Chris B. Watkins

for 70 days, are shown, along with specific illustrations of chilling injury and decay in fruit stored at 5 °C and 15 °C. Other crops, such as sweetcorn, have daily photographs of quality changes taking place at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C. In all, quality

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Todd C. Wehner and Beiquan Mou

, rhubarb, soybean, spinach, squash, sweetcorn, Swiss chard, tomato, turnip, watermelon. This list of the North American vegetable cultivars was developed using the database of cultivars registered with the American Seed Trade Association, as well as

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Sven Verlinden, Louis McDonald, James Kotcon, and Silas Childs

Tillage Res. 153 66 75 Gilman, S. Langer, J. 2011 Organic soil fertility and weed management. Chelsea Green, White River Junction, VT Gunter, C.C. 2010 Cover crops in processing tomato, snap beans and sweetcorn production yield and harvest quality Acta

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S. Castro Bustamante and T.K. Hartz

.T. Prostak, D.J. Paterson, J.W. 1995 Pre-sidedress soil nitrate test for sweetcorn HortScience 30 1033 1036 Heckman, J.R. Morris, T. Sims, J.B. Sieczka, U. Krogmann, U. Nitzsche, P. Ashley, R. 2002 Presidedress soil nitrate test is effective for fall cabagge

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Steve M. Spangler, Dennis D. Calvin, Joe Russo, and Jay Schlegel

92 Adams R.G. Clark J.C. Northeast sweet corn production and integrated pest management manual Univ. Connecticut Coop. Ext., Storrs Dively, G.P. 2006 Does it pay to grow Bt sweet corn? 12 May 2008 < http://www.glexpo.com/2006abstracts/SweetCorn2006