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C.D. Kokkinos, C.A. Clark, C.E. McGregor, and D.R. LaBonte

Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD) is the most devastating disease of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] globally. It is caused by the co-infection of plants with a potyvirus, sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), and a crinivirus, sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). In this study we report the use of cDNA microarrays, containing 2765 features from sweetpotato leaf and storage root libraries, in an effort to assess the effect of this disease and its individual viral components on the gene expression profile of I. batatas cv. Beauregard. Expression analysis revealed that the number of differentially expressed genes (P < 0.05) in plants infected with SPFMV alone and SPCSV alone compared to virus-tested (VT) plants was only 3 and 14, respectively. However, these findings are in contrast with SPVD-affected plants where more than 200 genes were found to be differentially expressed. SPVD-responsive genes are involved in a variety of cellular processes including several that were identified as pathogenesis- or stress-induced.

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Cecilia E. McGregor, Douglas W. Miano, Don R. LaBonte, Mary Hoy, Chris A. Clark, and Guilherme J.M. Rosa

losses of up to 90% ( Gutierrez et al., 2003 ), and is caused by dual infection of sweetpotato plants with sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). SPFMV is a potyvirus (Potyviridae) transmitted by

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Scovia Adikini, Settumba B. Mukasa, Robert O.M. Mwanga, and Richard W. Gibson

. Literature Cited Adikini, S. Mukasa, S.B. Mwanga, R.O.M. Gibson, R.W. 2016 Effects of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus on the yield of sweetpotato in Uganda J. Phytopathol. 164 242 254 Aritua, V. Alicai, T. Adipala

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D.W. Miano, D. R. LaBonte, and C. A. Clark

Sweetpotato is an important staple food crop in Sub-Saharan Africa, with production being concentrated in East Africa, particularly around Lake Victoria. Productivity of the crop is greatly constrained by viral diseases. Four main viruses have consistently been detected from various surveys done in the region viz. sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV), sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV), and sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV). Sweet potato caulimo-like virus (SPCaLV), sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) have also been detected though only in isolated cases. The most severe symptoms have been caused by co-infection with SPCSV and SPFMV, resulting in the synergistic Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD). Yield reductions due to virus infections have been estimated to be >90% in very severe cases. Virus detection has mainly been limited to the use of serological methods. Some plants have been observed with symptoms resembling those caused by viruses, but do not react with available antisera, indicating that the plants could be infected with viruses that have not been described, or not tested in the region. Use of other detection techniques such as PCR may result in identification of more viruses in the region. This report gives a summary of our research efforts towards detection of other viruses present in the region, and identification of resistant germplasm.

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D.W. Miano, D. R. LaBonte, and C. A. Clark

Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD) is a major constraint to sweetpotato production in East Africa. The disease is a result of co-infection with sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). Some local sweetpotato genotypes have been reported to recover from, or have localized distribution of SPVD, suggesting that the disease is not fully systemic. This has led to the suggestion that uninfected cuttings may be obtained from previously infected plants. Experiments were set to determine the possibility of obtaining cuttings long enough for propagation that are free from virus infection. This would form a basis for recommending to the local small-holder farmers of a way to reduce losses due to the disease. Field grown sweetpotato vines were cut into three pieces (15, 15 to 30, and >30 cm from the apex) and tested for SPCSV and SPFMV. Nine genotypes were selected from a group of 21 local clones and used for this study. The two viruses were equally present in all the three sections of infected vines, indicating that it is not easy to obtain a virus free cutting for field propagation from an infected vine.

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method the following potyviruses were successfully detected with polyclonal antisera: Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (several strains), Sweet potato virus G, and Ipomoea vein mosaic virus. Similarly, Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus was

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disease in sweetpotato is the Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD), a result of co-infection of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV) and Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV). Characteristic symptoms include chlorosis, small, deformed leaves