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Maxym Reva, Custodia Cano, Miguel-Angel Herrera, and Alberto Bago

Global climate change is increasing temperatures worldwide, which greatly affects all biological relationships. Plant and soil ecosystems are also suffering in this new scenario, especially in semi-arid areas where water resources are limited. Regarding agricultural crops, temperatures that increase dramatically negatively affect fruit production and quality, making it mandatory to find sustainable practices to cope with these new situations. Symbiotic microorganisms in general and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in particular have been revealed as promising methods of alleviating stress that are respectful of the environment and soil equilibrium. In this work, we demonstrate the suitability of an ultra-pure, in vitro-issued arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculant for alleviating severe heat stress when applied to three important agricultural crops (tomato: Solanum lycopersicum L.; pepper: Capiscum annuum L.; cucumber: Cucumis sativus L.) under agronomic conditions. Inoculated plants had greatly improved endurance under heat stress because of increased vigor, productivity, and fruit quality. Considering the actual scenario of global climate change, our results shed a light of hope and indicate more sustainable cultivation practices adapted to global change.

Free access

Muhammad Mansoor Javaid, Manish Bhan, Jodie V. Johnson, Bala Rathinasabapathi, and Carlene A. Chase

evolution of allelochemicals in this species was an ancient one, perhaps predating speciation. The results are useful for choosing accessions with higher or lower allelopathic potentials, a critical decision in sustainable crop management. In addition, the

Open access

Jacob H. Shreckhise, James S. Owen Jr., Matthew J. Eick, Alexander X. Niemiera, James E. Altland, and Brian E. Jackson

initiation (DAI) by releasing 75,000 predatory mites ( Hypoaspis miles ; Biobest Sustainable Crop Management, Westerlo, Belgium) evenly divided among the 20 plants on the substrate surface. Irrigation was controlled with GEVA 75 irrigation window controllers