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Muhammad Imran Al-Haq, Y. Seo, S. Oshita, and Y. Kawagoe

The fungicidal effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] fruit was studied. Fruit were inoculated with a spore suspension of 5 × 105 conidia/mL of Monilinia fructicola [(G. Wint.) Honey] applied as a drop on wounded and nonwounded fruits, or by a uniform spray-mist on nonwounded fruits. Fruit were immersed in tap water at 26 °C for 5 or 10 minutes (control), or treated with EO water varying in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), pH, and free available chlorine (FAC). Following treatment, fruit were held at 20 °C and 95% relative humidity for 10 days to simulate retail conditions. Disease incidence was determined as the percentage of fruits showing symptoms of the disease, while severity was expressed as lesion diameter. EO water did not control brown rot in wound-inoculated fruits, but reduced disease incidence and severity in nonwound-inoculated peach. Symptoms of brown rot were further delayed in fruit inoculated by a uniform-spray mist compared with the nonwounded-drop-inoculated peaches. Fruit treated with EO water held for 8 days at 2 °C, 50% RH, did not develop brown rot, until they were transferred to 20 °C, 95% RH. The lowest disease incidence and severity occurred in fruit immersed in EO water for up to 5 minutes. EO water having pH 4.0, ORP 1,100 mV, FAC 290 mg·L-1 delayed the onset of brown rot to 7 days, i.e., about the period peach stays in the market from a packing house to consumer. No chlorine-induced phytotoxicity was observed on the treated fruit. This study revealed that EO water is an effective surface sanitizer, but only delayed disease development.

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fruit quality. Although the sanitizers on fruit slices were successful in reducing microbial growth on cut surfaces, sanitation of the whole fruit had a direct effect on microbial populations of fruit slices cut from whole fruit. EARLY FIELD DETECTION OF

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Jiwon Jeong, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Donald J. Huber, and Steven A. Sargent

(data not shown). There was no visible microbial development at any time during storage, probably as a result of initial selection of healthy specimens, surface sanitation, short storage time, and low processing and storage temperature. Many factors

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Leslie D. Hintz, Renee R. Boyer, Monica A. Ponder, Robert C. Williams, and Steven L. Rideout

exterior were unlikely. It is possible that more root samples were positive as a result of the high concentration of the S . Newport in the soil surrounding the root. A different surface sanitation method may have been more effective in sanitizing the