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Engin Ertan, Esra Erdal, Gülsüm Alkan and Burak E. Algül

, enzyme activity and pericarp characteristics, the shelf life of chestnuts is very limited ( Correia et al., 2009 ). Therefore, chestnuts are frozen, cold stored, or dried to extend their storage period. However, the nuts have a high moisture content and

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Ibrahim Demir and Kazim Mavi

Differences in the field emergence of seed lots with high laboratory germination or in germination after storage are referred to as seed vigor ( Dornbos, 1995 ; TeKrony, 2003 ), a concept that comprises various aspects of quality and indicates

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Qingqing Duan, Ye Lin, Wu Jiang and Danfeng Huang

decrease the quality caused by temperature and light stress. Providing light during storage could extend the storability of seedlings of many horticultural species, even at very low light intensity ( Justus and Kubota, 2010 ; Kubota et al., 2002 ; Park

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Charles F. Forney

extended storage and marketing periods. However, for a variety of known and unknown reasons, successful storage of fresh cranberries has been variable and fruit loss is often excessive. Unlike most fruit, the optimum conditions for the storage of fresh

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Charles F. Forney

High-quality cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit are required to fulfil the growing markets for fresh fruit. Storage losses of fresh cranberries are primarily the result of decay and physiological breakdown. Maximizing quality and storage life of fresh cranberries starts in the field with good cultural practices. Proper fertility, pest management, pruning, and sanitation all contribute to the quality and longevity of the fruit. Mechanical damage in the form of bruising must be minimized during harvesting and postharvest handling, including storage, grading, and packaging. In addition, water-harvested fruit should be removed promptly from the bog water. Following harvest, fruit should be cooled quickly to an optimum storage temperature of between 2 and 5 °C (35.6 and 41.0 °F). The development of improved handling, refined storage conditions, and new postharvest treatments hold promise to extend the storage life of fresh cranberries.

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Sven Verlinden, Silvanda M. Silva, Robert C. Herner and Randolph M. Beaudry

plants, the storage carbohydrates are primarily fructans, which are located in the roots ( Shiomi, 1993 ). Mobilization in support of spear growth is initiated by hydrolysis of fructans to sucrose and subsequent transport of the sucrose to the above

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Jennifer R. DeEll, Clément Vigneault, Frédérique Favre, Timothy J. Rennie and Shahrokh Khanizadeh

The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of vacuum cooling and temperature on the quality and storage life of mung bean sprouts (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). Sprouts in micro-perforated bags were either not precooled or vacuum cooled to 9, 6, or 3 °C, and stored for 7 days at 1, 3, or 6 °C. Vacuum-cooled bean sprouts lost more weight than sprouts not precooled, and the weight loss was greater when the sprouts were cooled to lower temperatures. However, the total loss never exceeded 5% and no apparent signs of shrivel were observed. Vacuum cooling resulted in greater product freshness after 4 days of storage, but the effect was nonsignificant after 7 days. Storage temperature had greater influence on bean sprout quality than did cooling temperature, with greater freshness and whiter hypocotyls at the lower temperatures. However, blackening of cotyledons increased as the storage temperature decreased.

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K.N. Al-Redhaiman

Mature 'Barhi' dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) were stored in air or under controlled atmosphere (CA) storage conditions with 5%, 10%, or 20% carbon dioxide concentrations (balance air) during storage at 0 °C. CA conditions extended date storability by maintaining fruit quality. Fruit quality was maintained for 26 weeks when stored in 20% CO2, 17 weeks in both 5% and 10% CO2, and 7 weeks in air. Treatment with 20% CO2 maintained fruit color, firmness, SSC%, total sugar content, and total tannins. CO2 treatment also reduced degradation of caffeoylshikimic acid (CSA), which is one of the major phenolic compound of date fruit. This study indicates that 'Barhi' dates could be stored under CA conditions in cold storage with good eating quality for 17 to 26 weeks.

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Gene E. Lester and Michael A. Grusak

Commercially grown honey dew fruit [Cucumis melo (Inodorus group)] typically are harvested before abscission because fruit cut unripe have a longer storage life than fully ripe fruit. However, because fully ripe fruit contain higher concentrations of soluble solids (predominantly as sugars), an attribute that increases their preference among consumers, methods are being explored to extend the storage life of fully ripe fruit. In this study, fully abscised honey dew fruit were evaluated for tissue attributes and consumer preference following postharvest dipping in either chelated or nonchelated calcium (Ca) solutions. Calcium sources were an amino acid-chelated Ca, ethylene-diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-chelated Ca, or calcium chloride (CaCl2), with each provided at three different rates. Fruit were evaluated at harvest, and after 14 or 22 days commercial storage. Evaluations were peel surface changes (color and disorders), hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration, flesh firmness, soluble solids concentration, and consumer preference of the edible flesh. Peel color became yellowed and lighter during storage for all fruit, with higher Ca rates resulting in more intensely yellowed fruit. Hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration was 0.90 mg·g-1 of fresh weight (900 ppm) at harvest, and declined in all fruit by 22 days storage. Peel disorders (disease and spotting) were none to slight for all fruit by 14 days storage, but by 22 days storage disease incidence ranged from none to severe, depending on the Ca source and rate. Fruit firmness declined in all fruit throughout storage, with the smallest declines measured in fruit treated with the amino acid-chelated Ca. Soluble solids concentration of fully ripe fruit was 12.3% at harvest, and showed either no decline or slight declines with storage among the treatments. Consumer preference was highest for freshly harvested fruit, but fruit were desirable even after 22 days storage across all treatments. Postharvest application of Ca at ≤0.16 m Ca in an amino acid-chelated form, versus EDTA-chelated Ca or CaCl2, slowed honey dew melon senescence so that after 22 days of commercial and retail storage the fruit were of high marketable quality, and there was no detrimental effect on consumer preference for the edible flesh.

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Eric E. Roos and C.W. Vertucci

173 WORKSHOP 29 Seed Storage