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Jinwook Lee, James P. Mattheis and David R. Rudell

study was to investigate fruit size and 1-MCP treatment impacts on physical and physiological changes and the incidence of storage disorders such as senescent breakdown, stem-end browning, and cracking (splitting) in ‘Royal Gala’ apples stored in air at

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Meng Li, Huanhuan Zhi and Yu Dong

), 2 g·L −1 GB, or 4 g·L −1 GB. All treatments were applied once on 15 June, 1WBH. Fruit were harvested on 22 June an then loaded into polyethylene bags and stored at 0 °C for up to 4 weeks. Fruit quality attributes and storage disorders were analyzed

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Christopher B. Watkins, Mustafa Erkan, Jacqueline F. Nock, Kevin A. Iungerman, Randolph M. Beaudry and Renae E. Moran

`Honeycrisp' is a new apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] cultivar that has been planted extensively in North America, but the storage disorders soggy breakdown and soft scald have resulted in major fruit losses. The effects of harvest date and storage temperature on fruit quality and susceptibility of fruit to these disorders have been investigated in Michigan, New York, and Maine. Internal ethylene concentrations were variable over a wide range of harvest dates, and a rapid increase in autocatalytic ethylene production was not always apparent. The starch pattern index, soluble solids content, titratable acidity and firmness also appear to have limited use as harvest indices. Development of soggy breakdown and soft scald is associated with later harvest dates and storage of fruit at temperatures of 0 to 0.5 °C compared with higher storage temperatures. It is recommended that `Honeycrisp' be stored at 3 °C, although storage disorders still can occur at this temperature if fruit are harvested late. In addition, greasiness development may be worse at higher storage temperatures.

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Jinwook Lee, James P. Mattheis and David R. Rudell

analyses were conducted using SAS version 9.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Fruit quality attributes and storage disorder results were subjected to analysis of variance using the general linear model (Proc GLM) to determine main effects and interactions and

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Jennifer R. DeEll and Geoffrey B. Lum

’ apples ( de Castro et al., 2007 ). However, inconsistencies and year-to-year variation in the effects of delayed CA establishment for alleviating certain storage disorders in apples have also been documented ( Argenta et al., 2000 ; DeEll and Ehsani

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Jennifer DeEll and Behrouz Ehsani-Moghaddam

treatments (1 and 2 d after harvest) on fruit quality and storage disorders in apples. ‘McIntosh’ and ‘Spartan’ apples were studied through long-term storage in air and CA. ‘McIntosh’ was also used to determine if two consecutive treatments of the label rate

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Linda M. Boyd and Andrew M. Barnett

-generated hormones are both likely to be involved ( Cutting and Lyne, 1993 ; Harrell and Williams, 1987 ). Kiwifruit can be cool-stored for several months after harvest but can be affected by storage disorders such as low temperature breakdown. Both fruit maturity

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Jennifer R. DeEll, Jennifer T. Ayres and Dennis P. Murr

et al., 2007 ; Fan et al., 1999a , 1999b ; Watkins, 2006 ). 1-MCP affects the incidence of storage disorders in a variety of ways, depending on apple cultivar and storage regime. Superficial scald is generally reduced by 1-MCP ( DeEll et al., 2002

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Renae E. Moran, Jennifer R. DeEll and Dennis P. Murr

A color atlas of post-harvest diseases and disorders of fruits and vegetables Vol. 1 CRC Press Boca Raton, FL Watkins, C.B. Nock, J.F. Iungerman, K.A. 2003 Harvest date effects on maturity, quality and storage disorders of Honeycrisp apples from the

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Yousheng Duan, Zhiqiang Ju and Zhiguo Ju

Effects of different plant oils (soybean, corn, peanut, cottonseed, conola, sunflower, safflower, rape seed, and linseed) on mealiness, leatheriness, and flesh browning (FB) in `Elegant Lady' peaches (Prunus persica Batsch) were studied. Fruit were harvested at three dates (10 days apart) with the second harvest concomitant to commercial harvest, dipped in a 5% or 10% oil emulsion for 3 min, and stored at 0 or 5 °C, respectively. After 6 weeks at 0 °C, fruit developed more leatheriness and FB but less mealiness in early harvested compared to late-harvested fruit. When stored at 5 °C, fruit did not develop any leatheriness regardless of harvest dates, but fruit from the last harvest developed high levels of mealiness and FB compare with fruit from the other two harvests. FB was found only, but not in all, leathery or mealy fruit. None of the oils affected leatheriness, but all reduced mealiness to the same extent at the same concentration. Oil treatments controlled FB completely in both leathery and mealy fruit. Oil at 10 % was more effective in controlling mealiness and FB than at 5%. Oil-treated fruit had higher flesh firmness and titratable acidity and developed less decay than the controls at removal from storage.