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Michael A. Ortiz, Krystyna Hyrczyk, and Roberto G. Lopez

stem caliper. Stem marketability was determined by length (greater than 30 cm) and flower quality (no visual defects). Stems shorter than 30 cm and stems with damaged or disfigured flowers were deemed unmarketable. The experiment was laid out in a

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Alicain S. Carlson and John M. Dole

intermediate in stem length at 49.8 cm. Stem caliper in the field at both planting densities did not differ from one another with 12.1 mm at the low density and 11.8 mm at the high density, but stem calipers at each density were significantly lower than those

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Wesley C. Randall and Roberto G. Lopez

length (measured from the base of the hypocotyl to the shoot apical meristem) and stem caliper above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany). Relative chlorophyll content was measured with a SPAD meter (SPAD-502; Konica

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Christopher J. Currey, Veronica A. Hutchinson, and Roberto G. Lopez

high-quality rooted cuttings by maximizing root growth, total mass, root-to-shoot mass ratio, and stem caliper while minimizing production time and stem elongation ( Lopez and Runkle, 2008 ; Pramuk and Runkle, 2005 ). To meet the spring and early

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Brandon M. Miller and William R. Graves

, number of taproot branches, stem height, stem caliper, and number of fibrous first-order lateral roots were quantified. Data were collected by removal of the containers and placement of plants in large buckets filled with tap water. Once saturated

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Kaitlyn M. McBride, Richard J. Henny, Terri A. Mellich, and Jianjun Chen

collections consisted of canopy height and widths (the widest canopy width and the width perpendicular to the widest width), the largest leaf length and width, stem caliper at the soil line, final weekly flower number, root and top dry weights, and visual

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Joshua K. Craver, Jennifer K. Boldt, and Roberto G. Lopez

length (measured from the base of the hypocotyl to the shoot apical meristem), stem caliper [measured above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany)], and total number of nodes. Leaf area (LA) was collected using a LA

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Joshua K. Craver, Jennifer K. Boldt, and Roberto G. Lopez

) and stem caliper [mm; measured above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany)]. Leaf area (cm 2 ) was recorded using a leaf area meter (LI-3100; LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE) by removing the seedling leaves at the axil

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Paul E. Cappiello

The effect of a fish hydrolyzate fertilizer product on growth of Acer rubrum and Pseudotsuga menzeisii was studied. Bare root plants were fertilized at a rate of 90, 180, and 270 kilograms of N/hectare. Soil samples were collected every two weeks throughout the summer and were analyzed for nutrient content. In addition, August leaf samples were collected and analyzed for N, P, and K content. Growth measurements on Acer rubrum indicate that stem caliper was significantly increased by all fertilizer treatments over the control trees. The granular fertilizer produced a significant linear increase in caliper growth with respect to fertilizer rate. Shoot growth was also significantly increased by all fertilizer treatments; however, as with caliper growth, the granular fertilizer treatments resulted in the greatest and most consistent response. The response of Pseudotsuga menzeisii showed significant increases in shoot growth and stem caliper but results were not as consistent as in the case of the maple.

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Gary J. Wilfret

Production of stock plants is essential for the asexual propagation of poinsettia, but variability exists among cultigens in the development of axillary shoots under high day/night temperatures of central Florida. Thirty-eight and 44 cultigens were grown during 1995 and 1996, respectively, and were evaluated for cutting production and subsequent growth of harvested cuttings. Plants were pruned twice prior to cutting harvest, with a projected cutting number of 21 in 1995 and 27 in 1996. Cuttings were graded into three groups based upon stem caliper and overall quality: #1, #2, and cull. Number of #1 cuttings/plant in 1995 ranged from 3.4 to 18.6, represented by `Cortez' and `Ball 838', respectively; a majority of the cultigens produced between 14 and 16 cuttings in the top grade. Number of usable (#1 and #2) cuttings ranged from 4.9 to 30.0, represented by `Cortez' and `Jolly Red', respectively, with a mean of 20.2. Stem caliper of cuttings measured 7 cm from terminal apex ranged from 0.55 cm of `Mikkel 520' to 0.91 cm of `Ball 838'. Cuttings of `Cortez' and `Red Splendor' had poor lateral development. During 1996, number of #1 cuttings ranged from 9.8 (`Picacho') to 22.2 (`Freedom'), with a mean of 16.6. Number of usable cuttings ranged from 14.2 to 31.9, represented by `Cortez' and `Spotlight Dark Red', with a mean of 25.3. Stem caliper ranged from 0.55 cm (`Ball 865') to 0.79 cm (`Supjibi'). Cuttings taken from plants of the `Cortez' series produced few, if any, laterals, while `Marblestar' and `Jolly Red' had up to 50% aborted axillary buds.