Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 43 items for :

  • "steam distillation" x
Clear All
Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Santosh Shiwakoti, Shital Poudyal, Thomas Horgan, Natasha Kovatcheva and Anna Dobreva

hypothesized that the duration of the steam distillation process would have a significant effect on garden sage essential oil yield and composition. Furthermore, testing a range of DTs may identify the optimal DT for oil yields and to obtain oil with a specific

Full access

B.H. Alkire and J.E. Simon

An experimental steam distillation unit has been designed, built, and tested for the extraction of essential oils from peppermint and spearmint. The unit, using a 130-gal (510-liter) distillation tank, is intermediate in size between laboratory-scale extractors and commercial-sized distilleries, yet provides oil in sufficient quantity for industrial evaluation. The entire apparatus-a diesel-fuel-fired boiler, extraction vessel, condenser, and oil collector-is trailer-mounted, making it transportable to commercial farms or research stations. Percentage yields of oil per dry weight from the unit were slightly less than from laboratory hydrodistillations, but oil quality and terpene composition were similar.

Free access

Ben H. Alkire and James E. Simon

A 500 liter (130 gallon) stainless steel steam distillation unit has been built to extract volatile essential oils from aromatic plants. A 1.5 m × 0.75 m dia. steam vessel (hydrostatically tested @ 125 psi) serves as the distillation tank. Low pressure or high pressure steam is supplied by a diesel fuel fired boiler of 10 horsepower. The steam vessel can hold peppermint from plots of 25 m2 and extract approximately 100 ml of essential oil per distillation. The size of the tub was designed to provide oil in sufficient quantity for industrial evacuation or for pesticide residue analysis. Following the distillation, the vessel can be disconnected from the cold-water condenser and rotated on swivels to a horizontal position, permitting easy removal and re-filling of plant material. The entire extraction unit (vessel, condenser, boiler and oil collector) is suitable for mounting upon a trader, making it transportable to commercial farms or research stations. The extraction of peppermint and spearmint oils using this new system will be presented.

Free access

Raymond A. Cloyd, Karen A. Marley, Richard A. Larson and Bari Arieli

Institute 2002 ). Data were considered significant when the P value was ≤ 0.05. All data presented are non-transformed. Steam distillation extraction experimental procedure. The volatile constituents of the dryer sheets were determined by gas

Free access

Raymond A. Cloyd, Karen A. Marley, Richard A. Larson and Bari Arieli

then the number was recorded. Steam distillation procedure. The volatile odor constituents of the growing media were determined using a steam distillation procedure ( Cloyd et al., 2007b ), which produced an extract that was analyzed using gas

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Barry O'Brocki and Ekaterina Jeliazkova

). Steam distillation has been traditionally used for extracting essential oil from anise seed. Steam DT has been demonstrated to alter essential oil yield and composition of other crops such as peppermint ( Mentha × piperita L.), lemongrass ( Cymbopogon

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie and Vicki Schlegel

through steam distillation ( Kula et al., 2007 ; Topalov, 1962 ), although other extraction methods such as hydrodistillation, CO 2 extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction have been reported ( Gaspar and Leeke, 2004 ; Karakaya et al., 2011

Free access

Denys J. Charles and James E. Simon

Essential oils were extracted from leaves, flowers, and stems of Ocimum basilicurn, O. kilimandscharicum, and O. micranthum by solvent extraction, hydrodistillation, and steam distillation for essential oil content and the oil analyzed by GC and GC/MS for composition. While the yield of essential oil was consistently higher from steam distillation than hydrodistillation, a similar number of compounds was recovered from both hydrodistillation and steam distillation. Though the relative concentration of the major constituents was similar by both methods, the absolute amounts were higher with steam distillation. Essential oil content and composition varied by plant species and plant part. Essential oil content was highest in flowers for O. basilicum and in leaves for O. micranthum. No significant differences were observed in essential oil yield and relative concentration of major constituents using fresh or dry samples and using samples from 75 g to 10 g of dry plant tissue. While minor differences between hydrodistillation and steam distillation were observed, both methods resulted in high yields and good recovery of essential oil constituents. Hydrodistillation is a more-rapid and simpler technique than steam and permits the extraction of essential oil where steam is not accessible.

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Thomas Horgan, Vicki Schlegel and Xavier Simonnet

cultivated in large areas of eastern Europe (Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania), and the essential oil is extracted through steam distillation of the biomass ( Nedkov and Attanassova, 2004 ). The essential oil of A. annua has applications in perfumery and

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Thomas Horgan and S. Marie Rogers

In the process of extracting essential oil from aromatic plants through steam distillation, there is the production of waste distillation water, which is released into the environment ( Lawrence, 2007 ; Topalov, 1989 ). The distillation water