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James W. Olmstead, Hilda Patricia Rodríguez Armenta, and Paul M. Lyrene

-173’ pedicels averaged 2.3 mm longer ( P < 0.0001) than the Florida industry standard cultivar Emerald, which is known for tight clusters and has not performed well for machine harvest. Fig. 1. Pedigree of ‘FL 01-173’ (Meadowlark™) southern highbush blueberry

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Jeffrey G. Williamson and D. Scott NeSmith

reported on CPPU effects on southern highbush blueberries. The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of several southern highbush cultivars to applications of CPPU under greenhouse and field conditions. Materials and Methods This

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Paul M. Lyrene

‘Emerald’ is a low-chill tetraploid southern highbush blueberry hybrid that is well adapted to northeast and central Florida and to other areas receiving similar winter chilling (100 to 400 h below 7 °C). Emerald produces a vigorous bush with stout, semierect canes. It has medium to good survival in the field in north Florida. In northeast Florida, ‘Emerald’ flowers from mid-January to mid-February and ripens from mid-April to mid-May. ‘Emerald’ is capable of producing high yields of berries that are large, firm, and medium-dark in color with a small, dry picking scar and good flavor.

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Stephen J. Stringer, Arlen D. Draper, Donna A. Marshall, and James M. Spiers

Southern highbush blueberries ( Vaccinium sp.) are hybrids derived from crosses between the (northern) highbush blueberry ( V. corymbosum ) and germplasm developed from Vaccinium spp. that is both native and adapted to the southeastern United

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D. Scott NeSmith

Southern highbush blueberries ( Vaccinium sp.) continue to increase in importance in Georgia and across the southern United States. Growers are particularly interested in their early ripening to enter the market just after fruit from the southern

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Stephen J. Stringer, Arlen D. Draper, James M. Spiers, Donna A. Marshall, and Barbara J. Smith

Southern highbush blueberries result from hybridizations among the northern highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and other Vaccinium spp. possessing southern U.S. adaptation attributes. Southern highbush blueberry cultivars provide

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Tongyin Li and Guihong Bi

early-ripening southern highbush blueberries (SHBs) presents an opportunity to increase market price significantly for the fresh blueberry market. Southern highbush cultivars generally require chilling hours of 200 to 700 and have low tolerance for

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Stephen J. Stringer, Donna A. Shaw, Blair J. Sampson, Hamidou F. Sakhanoko, Ebrahiem Babiker, John J. Adamczyk Jr., Mark K. Ehlenfeldt, and Arlen D. Draper

‘Gumbo’ (patent applied for) is a new southern highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium spp. hybrid) cultivar developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and is jointly released with the Mississippi Agricultural

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D. Scott NeSmith

Southern highbush blueberries ( Vaccinium sp.) are becoming increasingly important in Georgia and across the southern United States. Growers are particularly interested in their early ripening to be able to enter the market just after fruit from

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John R. Clark, Alejandra Salgado, Arlen Draper, Chad E. Finn, Paul Sandefur, and Peter Boches

://technology-commercialization.uark.edu/about.aspx ). Literature Cited Clark, J.R. Moore, J.N. 1999 ‘Ozarkblue’ and ‘Summit’ southern highbush blueberries, p. 18–21. In: J.R. Clark and M.D. Richardson (eds.). Horticultural studies—1998. Ark. Agr. Expt. Sta. Res. Serv. 466 Clark, J.R. Moore, J.N. Draper, A