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Kaitlyn M. Orde, Connor Eaton, and Rebecca G. Sideman

. ‘Carmel’ was the only cultivar to bolt by the time harvesting was ended in 2016. Soluble solids content (°Brix). Twenty leaves (five from each replication) were collected from each cultivar in the Cultivar Exp. at harvest for SSC measurements. SSC values

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Tomas N. Hasing, Luis F. Osorio, and Vance M. Whitaker

Soluble solids content is an important element of strawberry fruit quality. Approximately 80% to 90% of the SSC consists of sugars ( Perkins-Veazie, 1995 ), and high levels have frequently been associated with favorable sensory ratings in taste

Open access

Felipe Barrera Sánchez, Larissa Pereira Ribeiro, Mayara Fávero Cotrim, Carlos Antonio da Silva Junior, Leonardo Lopes Bhering, and Paulo Eduardo Teodoro

soluble solids content (TSS) stands out because the higher the TSS, the sweeter fruit flavor, and the higher °Brix genotypes are preferred by consumers ( Mitchell et al., 2019 ). In addition, to require the addition of less sugar during processing, fruit

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Alex Goke, Sara Serra, and Stefano Musacchi

location of destructive dry matter (DM) and soluble solids content (SSC) measurements taken on the pear fruit. ( A ) 25 mm diameter, 10 mm depth tissue plug from which near-infrared measurements were collected. Half of the plug assessed for DM after

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Matthew R. Mattia and John W. Scott

). Table 5. Tomato soluble solids content for 19 families of parents, F 1 s, and phenotypic groups of plants that segregated in the F 2 over Spring and Fall 2013 seasons. Table 6. Mean tomato soluble solids concentration for F 2 s grouped by phenotype for

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T. Casey Garvey and John D. Hewitt

Abbreviations: SSC, soluble solids content; QTL, quantitative-trait loci. 1 Present address: Hunt Wesson, 1111 Coven Blvd., Davis, CA 95616. 2 Present address: Rogers NK Research, P.O. Box 1827, Gilroy, CA 95021-1827. We acknowledge the assistance

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Steven J. MacKenzie, Craig K. Chandler, Tomas Hasing, and Vance M. Whitaker

peak bloom. Soluble solids content is the collective concentration of sugars, acids, and other substances dissolved in the cell sap. In strawberry, sugars comprise 80% to 90% of the SSC ( Perkins-Veazie, 1995 ). Fruit SSC is usually satisfactory for

Open access

B. B. Aulenbach and J. T. Worthington

Abstract

The relationship of soluble solids content (SSC) to sensory quality of several cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) grown in Maryland or California was studied during 3 growing seasons (1970-1972). SSC above 8% was not always associated with high sweetness, flavor, or acceptability. SSC and external color were not highly correlated. Until the relation between SSC and sensory quality has been more thoroughly studied for today’s cultivars, sensory tests should be an integral part of all research involving quality of cantaloupes.

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K.H.S. Peiris, G.G. Dull, R.G. Leffler, and S.J. Kays

A nondestructive method for measuring the soluble solids content (SSC) of individual processing tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was developed using NIR spectrometry. A diode array fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure NIR transmittance. Each fruit was scanned at two locations on opposite sides midway along the proximal-distal axis. After scanning, each fruit was processed and pureed, and SSC was determined using a refractometer. Multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS) regression, and neural network (NN) calibration models were developed using the second derivatives of averaged spectra from 780 to 980 nm. The validation results showed that NN calibration was better than MLR or PLS calibrations. The NN calibration could estimate the processed SSC of individual unprocessed tomatoes with a standard error of prediction of 0.52% and could classify >72% of fruit in an independent population within ±0.5% of SSC.

Open access

M. Dinar and M. A. Stevens

Abstract

The soluble solids content of ripe fruit of tomato (Lycopersicon esculeutum mill.) is positively associated with starch content early in fruit development. When 14C-sucrose or 14C-glucose were injected, the young fruits of the breeding line LA 1563 contained greater amounts of 14C in starch than those of the cultivars ‘UC 82B’. This, and the larger pool of hexoses in young fruits of ‘UC 82B’, implies that difference in starch synthesis is a primary factor affecting starch levels. The differences between 2 genotypes for fruit respiration and their ability to take up sucrose from an agar medium suggest that starch accumulation is a result of greater sink activity.