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K.L. Hensler, B.S. Baldwin, and J.M. Goatley Jr.

A truly soilless turfgrass sod may be produced on kenaf-based (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiber mat that offers the integrity of field-cut sod without the use of mineral soil growing medium. This research was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing warm-season turfgrass sod on such a biodegradable organic mat. Seeded turfgrass plots contained 4.9 lb/1000 ft2 (24 g.m−2) of pure live seed planted on a 66-lb/1000 ft2 (325-g.m−2) organic fiber mat carrier placed atop either 66- or 132-lb/1000 ft2 (325- or 650-g.m−2) organic fiber mats. In an experiment using vegetative material, stolons were applied at rates of 16.4 ft3/1000 ft2 (0.82 L.m−2) over 132- or 198-lb/1000 ft2 (650- or 975-g.m−2) organic fiber mats and covered with a rayon scrim. All plots were placed on 6-mil black plastic. Nitrogen was applied at 0.9 lb/1000 ft2 (4.4 g.m−2) weekly in addition to a monthly micronutrient application. Bermudagrass (Cynodon σππ.) had quicker establishment than other grasses in the study, with stolonized and seeded plots achieving ≈100% coverage by 9 weeks in 1995 and 6 weeks in 1996, respectively. By 15 weeks after planting in 1995, the plot coverage ratings for seeded centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack. `Common'] and all stolonized grass plots of centipedegrass, zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud. `Meyer'), and St. Augustinegrass [Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze `Raleigh'] were 91% or higher. The results were much less favorable in 1996 than 1995 due to a later planting date and an irrigation failure.

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M. Laganière, P. Lecomte, and Y. Desjardins

In Quebec, commercial sod is produced on >3000 ha. Generally, ≈20 months are required to produce market-ready sod. When conditions are suitable, harvest of marketable sod is possible within a year. However, intensive management may result in soil compaction and a reduction of the organic matter content. Considering the increasing amount of amendment available, sod production fields could be interesting for their disposal. In this study, visual quality and sod root growth was examined following an application of an organic amendment at 50, 100, and 150 t·ha–1, incorporated to depth of 6 or 20 cm. Plots established on a sandy soil receiving organic amendments had higher visual quality ratings. Bulk density was significantly reduced following compost or paper sludge application to a heavy soil. The shearing strength required to tear sod amended with compost was significantly higher in comparison with control and paper sludge treatments.

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Thomas R. Sinclair, Andrew Schreffler, Benjamin Wherley, and Michael D. Dukes

A key aspect in the establishment of turfgrass sod is rapid rooting or “knitting” of the sod into the underlying soil. Factors that ensure rapid sod rooting include 1) proper soil aeration; 2) adequate moisture in the underlying soil; and 3

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Georgia Ntatsi, Dimitrios Savvas, Georgia Ntatsi, Hans-Peter Kläring, and Dietmar Schwarz

). However, SOD activity in roots decreased as T was reduced from 19.4 to 17 °C in self-grafted ‘Kommeet’ and from 19.4 to 14.6 °C in plants grafted onto ‘Moneymaker’. At optimal T, self-grafted ‘Kommeet’ had the greatest SOD root activity, whereas at

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Erick G. Begitschke, James D. McCurdy, Te-Ming Tseng, T. Casey Barickman, Barry R. Stewart, Christian M. Baldwin, Michael P. Richard, and Maria Tomaso-Peterson

Weed Technol. 16 597 602 Fishel, F.M. Coats, G.E. 1994 Bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) sod rooting as influenced by herbicides Weed Technol. 8 46 49 Huang, B. Gao, H. 2000 Growth and carbohydrate metabolism of creeping bentgrass cultivars in response

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Daniel Hargey, Benjamin Wherley, Andrew Malis, James Thomas, and Ambika Chandra

placement on sod root anchorage. Wherley et al. (2011) studied effects of cutting height and nitrogen application rate on root development of four warm-season turfgrasses during a 70-d establishment period in Florida. The authors reported that increasing N