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Pierre C. Robert

103 COLLOQUIUM 3 (Abstr. 643–649) Applications of Site-specific Management for Horticultural Crop Production

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John LeBoeuf

103 COLLOQUIUM 3 (Abstr. 643–649) Applications of Site-specific Management for Horticultural Crop Production

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Joan R. Davenport

103 COLLOQUIUM 3 (Abstr. 643–649) Applications of Site-specific Management for Horticultural Crop Production

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Tim Righetti

103 COLLOQUIUM 3 (Abstr. 643–649) Applications of Site-specific Management for Horticultural Crop Production

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Joan R. Davenport and Mary J. Hattendorf

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) are grown extensively throughout the Pacific northwestern United States as a high value crop in irrigated rotations with other row crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and both field and sweet corn (Zea mays L.). Center pivots are the predominant irrigation systems. Soil texture ranges from coarse sands to finer textured silt loams and silts and can vary within one field, particularly in fields with hilly topography. Site specific management is being evaluated as an approach to help to optimize inputs (water, seed, agricultural chemicals) to maintain or enhance yield and reduce potential negative environmental impacts from these farming systems. Currently, variable rate fertilizer application technology and harvest yield monitoring equipment are commercially available for potato. Variable rate seeding and variable rate irrigation water application technologies are developed but not fully commercialized and variable rate pesticide application equipment is in development. At the Irrigated Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Prosser, Wash., we have a team of research scientists, interested individuals from local industry, and other key organizations (e.g. local conservation districts) who are working together to evaluate different site specific technologies, improve the ability to use available tools, and to improve decision-making ability by conducting research both on farm and in research plots.

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W. L. Corley

Contrary to popular notion, many wildflower taxa are quite specific in their edaphic requirements. From a compilation of 35 species adapted to Georgia and the Southeastern U.S., several mixes have been formulated to meet the siting preference of these taxa whose persistence may be annual, biennial, or perennial. Mixes presented are suited for landscape color, partial shade, xeric, mesic, aggressive, and specialty uses.

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Pierre C. Robert

A better awareness of soil and crop condition variability within fields brought the notion, in the early 1980s that variable management within fields by zones rather than whole fields would increase profitability by doing the right thing at the right place in the right way. At the same time, the microcomputer became available and made possible the acquisition, processing, and use of spatial field data as well as the development of a new kind of farm machinery with computerized controllers and sensors. Precision agriculture (PA) has been considered for most common cropping systems and some specialty crops, worldwide. It is particularly well adapted to high value crops such as many horticultural crops. PA is still in infancy and its adoption varies greatly but precision agriculture is the agricultural system of the future. It offers a variety of potential benefits in profitability, productivity, sustainability, crop quality, food safety, environmental protection, on-farm quality of life, and rural economic development.

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Steven P. Castagnoli

The Internet has expanded access to real-time decision tools for pest management in agriculture. Starting in 2000, site-specific weather data and decision tools for key insect pests and diseases became available through the Internet to fruit growers and pest control advisors (PCAs) in the Hood River Valley of Oregon. Adoption of these decision tools was supported by educational programs conducted by extension. In this study, surveys were conducted to assess the importance of different sources of pest management information and the adoption of four Internet-based pest management decision tools by fruit growers and PCAs in the Hood River Valley. Growers relied on diverse sources for pest management information and ranked PCAs as the most important source for making pest management decisions. Grower use of the Internet-based pest management decision tools was relatively low despite computer ownership and Internet use that were higher than national trends. Growers preferred the website that provided the most complete access to up-to-date weather data and pertinent pest and disease models, despite somewhat less streamlined access. PCA use of the decision tools was proportionately higher, and included greater use of additional websites. Both growers and PCAs considered use of the Internet tools to have important benefits on pest management programs. In the Hood River Valley, fruit growers had access to technology-driven decision support tools, but continued to rely on more traditional information sources, particularly PCAs, for making pest management decisions. In view of trends in shrinking extension resources, these results suggest that the most efficient use of time and potential for greatest impact can be derived from focusing educational efforts on PCAs.

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Arnold W. Schumann

recording of detailed logs of all fertilizer applications for spatial and temporal mapping. Thus, PA can help us determine exactly where to place nutrients and how much to apply, and then track the applied nutrients with accumulation logs and GIS maps. Site-specific

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Douglas C. Sanders

103 COLLOQUIUM 3 (Abstr. 643–649) Applications of Site-specific Management for Horticultural Crop Production