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Christopher S. Cramer and Joe N. Corgan

size than ‘Exacta’ in two drip irrigation environments ( Table 1 ). The percentage of single-centered bulbs produced by a cultivar is an important bulb quality trait to consider when selecting a cultivar for propagation because many onions are processed

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Christopher S. Cramer

environments ( Table 1 ). The percentage of single-centered bulbs produced by a red onion bulb cultivar is desirable for visual display when the bulb is cut transversely. ‘NuMex Grandeur’ produced a moderate to high percentage of single-centered bulbs and a

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Christopher S. Cramer

produce a high percentage of single-centered bulbs, usually greater than 85%, when purchasing onion bulb shipments for processing. In each environment, ‘NuMex Whisper’ was at or above that target percentage. Because scale characteristics and bulb firmness

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Christopher S. Cramer

needed at the FGSC for trials 1, 2, 3, and 5. Table 1. Bulb maturity, marketable yield, average bulb weight, bulb height, bulb diameter, bulb shape index, bulb firmness rating, percentage of single-centered bulbs, and pink root severity of ‘NuMex Allure

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Christopher S. Cramer

greening, and produces a high percentage of single-centered bulbs. In 1999, ‘Texas Early White’ was sown at an early autumn date (8–15 Sept.) that caused a high percentage (>85%) of plants to form premature seed stalks (bolting) in the following year. Bulbs

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Christopher S. Cramer

’ ( Table 1 ). The percentage of single-centered bulbs produced by a red onion bulb cultivar is desirable for visual display when the bulb is cut transversely. The percentage of single-centered bulbs is often a function of bulb size, as smaller bulbs tend to

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Clinton C. Shock, Erik Feibert, Lynn Jensen, S. Krishna Mohan and Lamont D. Saunders

2000, two additional variety characteristics were evaluated: super colossal size bulbs (>4¼ inches diameter) and single-centered bulbs ( Shock et al., 2005a ). An onion bulb is single-centered when all concentric rings in the bulb end in one center

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Carrie H. Wohleb and Timothy D. Waters

percentage of functionally single-centered bulbs was largest in 2012 (60.1%) and smallest in 2013 (54.8%), though a difference of 5.3% does not seem very large. There was no significant year effect on skin retention ( Table 6 ). Table 6. Average ratings for

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Christopher S. Cramer

Realized heritability estimates of bolting percentage, pink root and fusarium basal rot severities and incidences, and percentage of single-centered bulbs were estimated for half-sib families of an intermediate-day, open-pollinated onion (Allium cepa L.) population using selection response analysis. Half-sib families were selected based upon an index that equally weighted bolting percentage, pink root and fusarium basal rot severities and incidences, percentage of single-centered bulbs, and bulb quality. Families were subjected to one cycle of half-sib family recurrent selection. Pink root and fusarium basal rot severity was reduced by 17% and 7%, respectively, with realized heritability estimates of 1.28 and 0.65, respectively. More progress for pink root severity was made than was selected. Disease incidence was reduced by 18% and 12%, respectively, with heritability estimates of 0.65 and 0.60, respectively. Very little progress was made for the percentage of single-centered bulbs and this was reflected in a heritability estimate of 0.17. Selection based upon multiple characters at the same time may reduce the effectiveness of making improvements in a single trait. However even with low to moderate heritability, improvements were made, and suggest that further improvements can be made through selection.

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Jagtar Singh and Christopher S. Cramer

Onion growers in New Mexico often withhold irrigation for overwintered onion varieties during the months of December and January. This study was initiated to determine if this deficit irrigation program is detrimental to onion bulb quality. Twelve short- and intermediate-day onion cultivars, which differed in their maturity, were seeded in Sept. 2004 in Las Cruces, N.M. Once plants were established, 12 plots of each cultivar were not irrigated during the months of December and January (dry treatment), while the same number of plots was irrigated during these months (wet treatment). Once a plot had 80% of the plants with tops down, all bulbs were harvested, cured, and data on date of harvesting, bulb diameter, bulb height, firmness rating, number of centers, scale number, and scale thickness of first and third fleshy layers were collected. For most of the bulb traits measured, there was no difference between the two irrigation treatments for the cultivars tested. For the earliest-maturing cultivars, bulbs grown in the dry treatment had on average more fleshy scale layers than the bulbs grown in the wet treatment. For later-maturing cultivars, bulbs grown in the dry treatment had more growing points (centers) per bulb than the bulbs grown in the wet treatment. For the latest-maturing cultivars, average fleshy scale layer thickness was greater for bulbs grown in the dry treatment. From this work, a winter deficit irrigation program appears to be detrimental to the percentage of single-center bulbs for later-maturing, autumn-sown onion cultivars.