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Qi Chai, Xinqing Shao, and Jianquan Zhang

affect the germination when compared with 0 Si under saline conditions. Fig. 1. Germination rate of ‘Baron’ kentucky bluegrass as affected by silicon (Si) amendment at 0, 0.24, 0.48, 0.72, and 0.96 g·kg −1 soil levels under salinity stress and control

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Ozlem Altuntas, H. Yildiz Dasgan, and Yelderem Akhoundnejad

Silicon (Si) is the second-most abundant element in the earth’s crust ( Manivannan et al., 2016 ). Its availability to plants is low ( Hattori et al., 2005 ), and the forms of Si (monosilicic and polysilicic acid) are soluble and weakly adsorbed by

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Brian K. Hogendorp, Raymond A. Cloyd, and John M. Swiader

involves applying supplemental fertilizers to enhance plant resistance to insect pests ( Rojanaridpiched et al., 1984 ). As such, it has been suggested that applications of silicon may increase plant vigor and leaf epidermal toughness. In addition, silicon

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Brian K. Hogendorp, Raymond A. Cloyd, and John M. Swiader

The function of silicon in horticultural crops is not well understood, primarily because silicon is not considered an element essential for plant growth as indicated by the “criteria of essentiality” defined by Arnon and Stout (1939) ( Epstein

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Jonathan M. Frantz, Sushant Khandekar, and Scott Leisner

water-soluble fertilizers can eliminate those symptoms ( Bucher and Schenk, 2000 ), undiagnosed Cu toxicity in floriculture production may be more common than currently believed. Silicon is not considered to be an essential plant nutrient because most

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Sophia Kamenidou, Todd J. Cavins, and Stephen Marek

Silicon (Si) is not considered an essential nutrient for most plants with the exception of some Equisitaceae members and generally is not incorporated in commercially available fertilizers ( Epstein, 1994 ). Nowadays in Japan, Si is considered an

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Jennifer K. Boldt and James E. Altland

Silicon (Si) is associated with many positive physiological responses in plants ( Kamenidou et al., 2008 , 2010 ; Liang et al., 1996 ; Ma, 2004 ; Ma and Yamaji, 2006 ; Romero-Aranda et al., 2006 ; Savant et al., 1999 ). It is classified as a

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Wagner A. Vendrame, Aaron J. Palmateer, Ania Pinares, Kimberly A. Moore, and Lawrence E. Datnoff

Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil ( Epstein, 1999 ) and its function in plants still represents a subject for continued research ( Raven, 2003 ). A recent study demonstrated that Si plays a role in enhancing the growth and

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Yuan Li, Joseph Heckman, Andrew Wyenandt, Neil Mattson, Edward Durner, and A.J. Both

were more pronounced in the shoots than in the roots. Table 3. Calculated averages of greenhouse environmental data after transplanting. Both Expts. 1 and 2 were ended at 30 d after transplant. Table 4. Effects of silicon amendments on plant growth and

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Wendy L. Zellner

concentrations resulted in higher yields with less cracking ( Marodin et al., 2014 ). More notable are the beneficial responses to environmental and abiotic stresses of tomato plants treated with Si. Silicon has been shown to protect tomatoes against blossom