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Qi Chai, Xinqing Shao and Jianquan Zhang

affect the germination when compared with 0 Si under saline conditions. Fig. 1. Germination rate of ‘Baron’ kentucky bluegrass as affected by silicon (Si) amendment at 0, 0.24, 0.48, 0.72, and 0.96 g·kg −1 soil levels under salinity stress and control

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Ozlem Altuntas, H. Yildiz Dasgan and Yelderem Akhoundnejad

Silicon (Si) is the second-most abundant element in the earth’s crust ( Manivannan et al., 2016 ). Its availability to plants is low ( Hattori et al., 2005 ), and the forms of Si (monosilicic and polysilicic acid) are soluble and weakly adsorbed by

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Brian K. Hogendorp, Raymond A. Cloyd and John M. Swiader

involves applying supplemental fertilizers to enhance plant resistance to insect pests ( Rojanaridpiched et al., 1984 ). As such, it has been suggested that applications of silicon may increase plant vigor and leaf epidermal toughness. In addition, silicon

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Brian K. Hogendorp, Raymond A. Cloyd and John M. Swiader

The function of silicon in horticultural crops is not well understood, primarily because silicon is not considered an element essential for plant growth as indicated by the “criteria of essentiality” defined by Arnon and Stout (1939) ( Epstein

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Jonathan M. Frantz, Sushant Khandekar and Scott Leisner

water-soluble fertilizers can eliminate those symptoms ( Bucher and Schenk, 2000 ), undiagnosed Cu toxicity in floriculture production may be more common than currently believed. Silicon is not considered to be an essential plant nutrient because most

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Sophia Kamenidou, Todd J. Cavins and Stephen Marek

Silicon (Si) is not considered an essential nutrient for most plants with the exception of some Equisitaceae members and generally is not incorporated in commercially available fertilizers ( Epstein, 1994 ). Nowadays in Japan, Si is considered an

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Wagner A. Vendrame, Aaron J. Palmateer, Ania Pinares, Kimberly A. Moore and Lawrence E. Datnoff

Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil ( Epstein, 1999 ) and its function in plants still represents a subject for continued research ( Raven, 2003 ). A recent study demonstrated that Si plays a role in enhancing the growth and

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Gang Lu, Wenlei Jian, Jiajing Zhang, Yijing Zhou and Jiashu Cao

asparagus production. Although silicon (Si) is not defined as an essential element in classical parlance, Si is actively involved in metabolic or physiological activities, especially in plants subject to multiple stresses. Suppressive effects of Si against

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Sophia Kamenidou and Todd Cavins

Silicon (Si) is a nonessential element that has proven to be a beneficial supplement to agricultural crops. In floriculture greenhouse production, soilless substrates have limited Si content and supplements may improve plant quality. The objective of this study was to determine Si sources, rates, and application methods to improve plant quality. Zinnia elegans `Oklahoma Formula Mix', Helianthus annuus `Ring of Fire', and Gerbera `Acapella' were provided potassium silicate (KSiO3) as a media incorporated flakes or weekly drench, sodium silicate (NaSiO3) as weekly foliar spray or ashed rice hulls. Zinnia and Helianthus Si levels were highest in leaf (0.5% to 1.7%), followed by flower (0.3-0.5%) and stem (0.2-0.4%) tissues. Gerbera accumulated lower amounts of Si compared to Zinnia and Helianthus with similar leaf and flower content values ranging from 0.4% to 0.6% with stem values 0.4% Si. Depending on source and rate, several horticultural traits were improved. Zinnia benefits included stem thickness, increase in flower diameter and stem erectness. Helianthus Si supplementation resulted in increased stem thickeness and flower diameter. However, phytotoxicity problems occurred with Si rates above 200 mg·L–1 (SiO2 applied as weekly potassium silicate drench). Gerbera stems thickened with KSiO3 and NaSiO3 applications, but NaSiO3 foliar sprays increased stem length, flower diameter and resulted in earlier flowering.

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Kelly Nascimento-Silva, Luis Roca-Castillo, María Benlloch-González and Ricardo Fernández-Escobar

for plant growth but are beneficial to some plant species. One of this is Silicon (Si) ( Epstein, 1999 ; Ma, 2004 ). Si is the second most abundant element in the Earth’s crust ( Guntzer et al., 2012 ) following oxygen ( Epstein, 2009 ). In the soil