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Samir C. Debnath

The growth and development of lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) plants propagated either by conventional softwood cuttings or by in vitro shoot proliferation from nodal explants and by shoot regeneration from excised leaves of micropropagated shoots, were studied in cultivars `Regal', `Splendor', and `Erntedank'. Significant differences were observed between the treatments. After 3 years of growth, the in vitro-derived plants produced more stems, leaves, and rhizomes than the conventional cuttings which rarely produced rhizomes. In vitro culture on nutrient medium apparently induces the juvenile branching characteristics that favor rhizome production. This increase in vegetative growth and rhizome yield of in vitro-derived plants over stem cuttings varied among genotypes.

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Scott Aker and William Healy

Alstroemeria `Regina' and A. `Orchid' Linn. plants were grown in rhizotrons to facilitate non-destructive observation of shoot, rhizome, and storage root growth. In plants grown at 21/11 C or 21/21 C day/night temperatures under either 8 hr night interruption or an 8 hour short days, storage root growth was favored by cool (11 C) night temperatures and long days. The seasonal patterns of storage root and rhizome growth were inversely related to the seasonal pattern of shoot growth. Growth of shoots and rhizomes followed a cyclic pattern. The cycles of shoot and rhizome growth were in phase with each other until the plants resumed vegetative growth due to high soil temperature. At this point, the cycles of shoot and rhizome growth were shifted out of phase with each other. Thinning shoots by 60% resulted in delay and damping out of the peak of storage root growth; the cyclic growth of storage roots was disrupted when plants were thinned by 60% such that the cycles of active storage root growth were delayed by 1 week.

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Scott Aker and William Healy

Alstroemeria `Regina' and A. `Orchid' Linn. plants were grown in rhizotrons to facilitate non-destructive observation of shoot, rhizome, and storage root growth. In plants grown at 21/11 C or 21/21 C day/night temperatures under either 8 hr night interruption or an 8 hour short days, storage root growth was favored by cool (11 C) night temperatures and long days. The seasonal patterns of storage root and rhizome growth were inversely related to the seasonal pattern of shoot growth. Growth of shoots and rhizomes followed a cyclic pattern. The cycles of shoot and rhizome growth were in phase with each other until the plants resumed vegetative growth due to high soil temperature. At this point, the cycles of shoot and rhizome growth were shifted out of phase with each other. Thinning shoots by 60% resulted in delay and damping out of the peak of storage root growth; the cyclic growth of storage roots was disrupted when plants were thinned by 60% such that the cycles of active storage root growth were delayed by 1 week.

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Gerald M. Henry, Michael G. Burton, and Fred H. Yelverton

. (2006) suggested a possible correlation between bahiagrass success and low soil moisture content. Bahiagrass shoot and rhizome growth was greatest under droughtier soil conditions when grown on sandy loam soil regardless of whether grown in monoculture

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Sofia Flores, Marlon Retana-Cordero, Paul R. Fisher, Rosanna Freyre, and Celina Gómez

compete with the production of rhizomes and other plant organs, potentially affecting yield ( Ravindran and Babu, 2005 ). For example, it appears that in Expt. 2, tuberous roots under 24NISD and 28NISD had a negative effect on shoot and rhizome growth