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Pei Xu, Tingting Hu, Yuejian Yang, Xiaohua Wu, Baogen Wang, Yonghua Liu, Dehui Qin, Jeffrey Ehlers, Timothy Close, Zhongfu Lu and Guojing Li

China typically detected only three major types of principal flower color, which are purple, white, and tinged (Wang BG, personal communication). In terms of seedcoat color, a wide range of variations, including black, white or cream, brown, yellow, and

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Mark J. Bassett

Anecdotal evidence exists for nonflatulence among Chilean Manteca and Coscorrón market classes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and there is an hypothesis that the seedcoat color may be associated with superior digestibility. The inheritance of seedcoat color in `Prim', a Manteca market-class dry bean, was investigated using a protocol employing genetic interpretation of seedcoat colors in the F1 from testcrosses of `Prim' with a series of tester stocks. Most of the genetic tester stocks were constructed previously by backcrossing selected recessive alleles for seedcoat color into a recurrent parent (5-593) with seedcoat color genotype P [C r] D J G B V Rk Asp. The genetic tester stocks included two varieties, `Masterpiece' and `V0687', and testers constructed on the 5-593 background, viz., j BC2 5-593, d j BC2 5-593, asp BC2 5-593, b v BC2 5-593, v BC2 5-593, and c u BC3 5-593. The seedcoat color genotype of `Prim' was found to be P [C r] d j G b v lae. The implications of this genotype for pigment chemistry are discussed.

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M. Ndambe Nzaramba, Anna L. Hale, Douglas C. Scheuring and J. Creighton Miller Jr.

The inheritance of antioxidant activity (AOA) and its association with seedcoat color was investigated in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. Four advanced cowpea lines, ARK95-356 (black seedcoat) and ARK98-348 (red seedcoat), which were high (H) in AOA, and ARK96-918 (cream seedcoat) and LA92-180 (cream seedcoat), which were low (L) in AOA, were selected from the 2002 Regional Southernpea Cooperative Trials. They were crossed in a complete diallel mating design, generating F1, F1′ (1st generation and 1st generation reciprocal cross, respectively), F2, F2′ (2nd generations from F1, F1′), BC1, and BC2 (backcrosses to parents 1 and 2, respectively) populations. Individual seeds were ground and samples were extracted in methanol and analyzed for AOA using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Combining ability tests using Griffing's Method I Model I indicated presence of highly significant general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA), and reciprocal (RE) and maternal (MAT) effects, with pigmented lines exhibiting positive GCA and MAT, while nonpigmented lines exhibited negative GCA and MAT. AOA in the F1 was not significantly different from the maternal parent, with seedcoat color also resembling the maternal parent. Segregation for seedcoat color was observed in the F2 and F2′. Additive, dominance, and epistatic effects were significant. The broad sense heritability estimate was 0.87. Minimum number of genes responsible for AOA was estimated at five. Factors governing high AOA appeared to be the same as those responsible for seedcoat color, with apparent pleiotropic effects. In conclusion, breeding for high AOA in cowpea is possible using highly pigmented parental lines.

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Muharrem Ergun, Ellen T. Paparozzi, Dermot P. Coyne, Durward Smith, Stephen Kachman and David S. Nuland

Seedcoat color is an important trait, as it affects marketing and consumer acceptance of pinto beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Pinto breeding line NE 94-4 showed seedcoat yellowing in on-farm field trials in Nebraska in 1996 and 1997. Hail, sprinkler irrigation, and fall rainfall appeared to be involved in increasing seedcoat yellowing, based on analysis of field and weather data of on-farm trial sites. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of moisture on seedcoat yellowing of pinto line NE 94-4 (susceptible) and pinto `UI-114' (highly resistant). Two greenhouse experiments were conducted involving misting of bean plants near maturity and injecting water into maturing bean pods. Another experiment evaluated the response of seeds of these two bean entries to moisture by placing them on moist filter paper in petri dishes in the laboratory. Results showed that both genotype and moisture content are involved in seedcoat yellowing. This simple, cheap, and effective filter paper test was then used to evaluate seedcoat yellowing of nine pinto genotypes in response to moisture. Pinto NE 94-4 and `Kodiak' showed the greatest change, while `Bill Z' showed the least change, in seedcoat color.

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Mark J. Bassett and Phillip N. Miklas

Among light red and dark red kidney common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) varieties, pink seedcoat color (light red kidney) is dominant to dark red, but when Red Mexican varieties (with dark red seedcoats) are crossed with dark red kidney varieties, dark red seedcoat is dominant to the pink segregants observed in an F2 population. A genetic investigation of this reversal of dominance was performed by making crosses in all combinations among standard varieties of the four recessive-red market classes—Light Red Kidney `California Early Light Red Kidney', Pink `Sutter Pink', Red Mexican `NW 63', and Dark Red Kidney `Montcalm'—and observing segregation for seedcoat colors in F2 and F3 progenies. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that `NW 63' carries a new allele at Rk, viz., rk cd, where cd stands for convertible dark red kidney. Thus, C rk cd expresses dark red kidney seedcoats and c u rk cd expresses pink seedcoats. Also, C B rk cd expresses garnet brown seedcoats, whereas C B rk d expresses liver brown seedcoat color. Thus, we propose the gene symbol rk cd for the Rk locus gene in `NW 63'. The rk gene from Light Red Kidney `Redkloud' and `Sutter Pink' was backcrossed (with c u b v) into the recurrent parent 5-593, a Florida dry bean breeding line with seedcoat genotype P [C r] J G B V Rk. In the F2 progenies of BC2 to 5-593, the c u b v rk segregants from `Redkloud' gave true pink seedcoats, whereas those derived from `Sutter Pink' gave consistently very weak pink color under humid Florida growing conditions. We propose the gene symbol rk p, where p stands for pale pink, for the distinctive rk allele in `Sutter Pink'. The more general implications of the above findings were discussed.

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Mark J. Bassett

The inheritance of a new allele, cv, at the C locus for seedcoat color was studied in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) using plant introduction (PI) accession 527774 as the source of cv. The cross PI 527774 (yellow-brown seed) x v BC25-593 (mineral-brown seed) genetic tester stock was studied in F1 and F2 progeny. An F3 selection from the above cross, designated F3 cv G b v, was crossed to 5-593 (a Florida breeding line with black seeds), and the F1, and F2 progeny were analyzed for color segregation. The second hackcross [S-593 x F1 (F3 cv G b v x 5-593)] was investigated in selfed progenies from 32 random BC2-F1 parents. Two of the BC2-F2 progenies were further tested in BC2,-F3. A third hackcross of cv to 5-593 was made and analyzed, and an allelism test of cv B V BC2-F35-593 with the cartridge huff cu BC3 5-593 genetic tester stock confirmed that cv is an allele at C. The gene symbol, cv, is proposed for the new allele because it is only expressed with V and gives a grayish-brown seedcoat. Genotypes with C/cv do not show heterozygous mottling with G B v or G b v, and there is no difference in seedcoat color between C G B v and cv G B v, or between C G b v and cv G b v.

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Clifford W. Beninger, George L. Hosfield and Mark J. Bassett

Three dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes differing in seedcoat color, mineral brown (P C D J G B v), yellow brown (P C D J G b v), and pale greenish yellow (P C D J g b v), were analyzed phytochemically. Kaempferol 3-O-β-d-glucoside (astragalin) was isolated and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy from all three genotypes, and was the main flavonoid monomer present. Flavonoid polymers (condensed tannins) were detected by thin layer chromatography, but anthocyanins were not detected in the three genotypes. High pressure liquid chromatography analyses indicated that astragalin was present at similar concentrations in pale greenish yellow and mineral brown genotypes, but was significantly lower in yellow brown. Presently, we do not know the functions of the G and B color genes, although the presence of astragalin in the three genotypes studied indicates these genes do not appear to act in a qualitative manner with regard to astragalin production, but may control the amount of astragalin present. Subtle differences in color between these genotypes may be due to the amount and type of tannins which have secondarily polymerized with phenolics and flavonoid monomers.

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Mark J. Bassett

The inheritance of flower and seedcoat color was studied using Lamprecht line M0137 (PI 527845) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as the source of a new allele, V wf, at the V locus. The cross M0137 c res V wf × C v BC2 5-593 (a genetic tester stock) was studied in progeny of the F1, F2, F3, and F4 generations. The observed segregation for flower and seed colors was consistent with the hypothesis that M0137 carried a new allele, V wf, that produced (in the presence of P C J G B) white flowers and black seeds rather than the white flowers and mineral-brown seeds produced (in the presence of P C J G B) by v. The V/V wf genotype produced cobalt-violet flowers, the same as V/v. A test cross of F3 V wf × t BC1 5-593 bipunctata demonstrated that V wf is not allelic with t, a gene that can produce white or colored flowers and self-colored or partly colored seeds, depending on background genotype.

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Mark J. Bassett, Rian Lee, Carla Otto and Phillip E. McClean

Inheritance of the strong greenish-yellow (SGY) seedcoat color in `Wagenaar' common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was investigated. Line 5-593 is a determinate, Florida dry bean breeding line (with small black seeds) used as the recurrent parent in the development of many genetic stocks, e.g., g b v BC3 5-593. Through crosses with genetic tester stocks, the seedcoat genotype of `Wagenaar' was confirmed to be C J g b v lae Rk. Three randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers (OAP7850, OAP31400, and OU14950) that cosegregated with the G seedcoat color locus were developed from the F2 population derived from the cross g b v BC2 5-593 × G b v BC3 5-593. From the cross `Wagenaar' × g b v BC3 5-593, 80 F2 plants were classified into 54 non-SGY and 16 SGY seedcoat color plants. When the OAP7850 marker was applied to that population, linkage was not observed with the non-SGY and SGY phenotypes. Conversely, a molecular marker (OAP12400, that was developed from the F2 from the cross `Wagenaar' × g b v BC3 5-593) linked to the locus controlling the SGY phenotype segregated independently of the G locus. Therefore, SGY phenotype is not controlled by the G locus. An F3 progeny test of 76 F2 plants from the cross `Wagenaar' × g b v BC3 5-593 confirmed the hypothesis that a single recessive gene (for which we propose the symbol gy) controls the seedcoat color change from pale greenish yellow (PGY) to SGY. Through crosses with genetic tester stocks, the seedcoat genotype of `Enola' was determined to be C J g b v lae Rk. The test cross `Enola' × `Wagenaar' demonstrated that `Enola' also carries the gy gene. The relationship of `Enola' to the `Mayocoba' market class of common bean and to `Azufrado Peruano 87' is discussed.

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Mark J. Bassett

A cross was made between gri (gray-white seedcoat) and p (pure-white seedcoat) using genetic stocks gri BC2 5-593 and p BC2 5-593 developed to carry only a single recessive allele for seedcoat color in an otherwise all-dominant genetic background. The recurrent parent, 5-593, is a Florida dry-bean breeding line with bishops-violet flowers, determinate habit, small seed size, shiny black seeds, and seedcoat genotype T Mar P [C r] D J G B V Rk. The F1 progeny from the above cross between gri and p had the flower color pattern and seedcoat color of the griseoalbus character (gri), but had less intense color expression. Therefore, I hypothesized that gri is an allele at the P locus (allelic interaction). The hypothesis of allelism was confirmed in the F2, which failed to segregate for bishops-violet flowers and black seed, i.e., no complementation was evident. The symbol p gri is proposed for the new allele at P, where the dominance series is P > p gri > p. The gene for gray-white seeds in gri BC2 5-593 was shown to be allelic to Lamprecht's gri gene in V0059 (PI 527716).