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John R. Duval and D. Scott NeSmith

Production of triploid watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] transplants is hindered by low and nonuniform emergence, and seedcoat adherence. Seedcoat adherence leads to weakened and slow-growing plants. High seed costs are prohibitive to many transplant growers. Improvement of emergence would lower financial risks to growers and transplant producers. Mechanical scarification was examined as a means to decrease the impact of both problems. Seeds of `Genesis' triploid watermelon were placed in a cylinder with 100 g of very coarse sand and rotated for 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours at 60 rpm. Nontreated seeds were used as a control. Data were taken daily on emergence and seedcoat adherence. The experiment was repeated at three temperature regimes. No significant differences were observed in seedcoat adherence. Scarification, however, did significantly improve emergence under test conditions.

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Warley M. Nascimento and Sherlie H. West

The effects of seed priming and seed orientation on seedcoat adherence and seedling development of containerized muskmelon transplants were investigated. Seeds of muskmelon `Top Net SR' were primed for 6 days in darkness at 25 °C in an aerated solution of KNO3 (0.35 M). Primed and nonprimed seeds were individually planted in Styrofoam trays in the greenhouse. Seeds were carefully oriented with the radicle down, up, or in the horizontal position, and covered with 0.5 cm of the growing mix. Seed priming and seed orientation affected both seedcoat adherence and seedling development, and interaction between priming and orientation was significant for seedcoat adherence. Our data indicate that seed priming can minimize seedcoat adherence during emergence of muskmelon seeds.

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Warley M. Nascimento and Sherlie H. West

The effects of seed priming and seed orientation on seedcoat adherence and seedling development of containerized muskmelon transplants were investigated. Seeds of muskmelon `Top Net SR' were primed for 6 days in darkness at 25 °C in an aerated solution of KNO3 (0.35 m). Primed and nonprimed seeds were individually planted in Styrofoam trays in the greenhouse. Seeds were carefully oriented with the radicle down, up, or in the horizontal position, and covered with 0.5 cm of the growing mix. Seed priming and seed orientation affected both seedcoat adherence and seedling development, and interaction between priming and orientation was significant for seedcoat adherence. Our data indicate that seed priming can minimize seedcoat adherence during emergence of muskmelon seeds.

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John R. Duval and D. Scott NeSmith

Production of triploid watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] transplants is hindered by poor, inconsistent emergence, and frequent seed coat adherence to cotyledons. Seed coat adherence leads to weakened and slow growing plants. High seed costs, coupled with stand establishment problems, discourages transplant producers from growing this crop. Improvement of triploid watermelon emergence will lessen financial risks to growers and transplant producers and will provide a more reliable production system. Mechanical scarification was evaluated as a means to overcome inconsistent emergence and seed coat adherence. Seeds of `Genesis' triploid watermelon were placed in a cylinder with 100 g of very coarse sand (1.0 to 2.0 mm diameter) and rotated at 60 rpm for 0, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours in a series of experiments. Number of emerged seed was recorded daily, to obtain emergence dynamics. No significant differences were observed in seed coat adherence among treatments. The longest duration of scarification However, enhanced emergence as compared to the control in three of four experiments. These data support earlier suggestions that a thick or hard seed coat is a factor contributing to poor germination and emergence of triploid watermelons.

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S.L. Grange, D.I. Leskovar, L.M. Pike and B.G. Cobb

Poor and inconsistent germination is a problem in triploid watermelon. Nicking was shown effective in improving germination in triploid cultivars. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high and low medium moisture, and nicking on diploid and triploid seed germination. Germination for the diploid cultivar was unaffected by any treatment. At high moisture conditions, triploid seed germination was severely reduced to less than 15%, while nicking significantly improved germination up to 40%. However, this increase is still not commercially acceptable. When seed morphological components were measured for each cultivar, triploid seeds had a larger and highly variable air space as compared to the diploid seed. The data confirm that seed germination is not inhibited by the seedcoat alone, but appears to be highly sensitive to excessive water conditions.

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Matthew B. Bertucci, David H. Suchoff, Katherine M. Jennings, David W. Monks, Christopher C. Gunter, Jonathan R. Schultheis and Frank J. Louws

503 514 Maynard, D.M. 1989 Triploid watermelon seed orientation affects seedcoat adherence on emerged cotyledons HortScience 24 603 604 Mickelbart, M.V. Hasegawa, P.M. Bailey-Serres, J. 2015 Genetic mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance that translate

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Matthew B. Bertucci, Katherine M. Jennings, David W. Monks, Jonathan R. Schultheis, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Frank J. Louws and David L. Jordan

4711 Louws, F.J. Rivard, C.L. Kubota, C. 2010 Grafting fruiting vegetables to manage soilborne pathogens, foliar pathogens, arthropods and weeds Scientia Hort. 127 2 127 146 Maynard, D.M. 1989 Triploid watermelon seed orientation affects seedcoat