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Robert T. Eddy and Clifford S. Sadof

Horticulture businesses will be encouraged to hire qualified individuals with disabilities due to the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Maintaining a safe workplace is a considerable challenge due to the use and storage of restricted-use pesticides. In a vocational training program, two persons with mental disabilities were trained to be effective Integrated Pest Management scouts using systematic teaching procedures. Trainees acquired employable skills while providing a service that enabled management to reduce use of conventional pesticides on a greenhouse poinsettia crop by up to 65%.

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Anthony LeBude, Amy Fulcher, Jean-Jacque Dubois, S. Kris Braman, Matthew Chappell, J.-H (J.C.) Chong, Jeffrey Derr, Nicole Gauthier, Frank Hale, William Klingeman, Gary Knox, Joseph Neal and Alan Windham

emergence of complex pests. As a result, SNIPM has been trying to improve grower resources for scouting, monitoring, and decision making concerning IPM by conducting research ( Frank et al., 2013 ; LeBude and Adkins, 2014 ; Yeary et al., 2015 ), or

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Victoria A. Caceres, Cale A. Bigelow and Douglas S. Richmond

associated with biologically based alternatives ( Potter and Braman, 1991 ; U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, 1995 ). Furthermore, the reluctance of property owners to pay for or engage in scouting and monitoring activities means there is no

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Raymond A. Cloyd and Clifford S. Sadof

A 2-year greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the seasonal population dynamics and use of an action threshold for western fl ower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) in cut carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus). An action threshold of 20 thrips/card/week was adopted to time insecticide applications. The highest numbers of thrips were caught on blue-colored sticky cards from May through September whereas the lowest thrips numbers were present from November through March 1994 and 1995. Thrips numbers based on sticky card counts, from December through March for both years were below the action threshold and as a result, no insecticides were applied. Thrips abundance on blue sticky cards was significantly correlated with both numbers of thrips in fl owers and a subjective ranking of fl ower quality. Seasonal patterns of both insecticide use and numbers of damaged fl ow- ers closely followed patterns of thrips abundance found on blue sticky cards. Our findings are the first to demonstrate, based on a case study over a 2-year period, that routinely scouting for thrips throughout the year can lead to fewer insecticide applications and thus possible cost savings in labor and insecticide purchases. This study suggests that sticky cards can be an effective tool for reducing insecticide applications in regions of the U.S. where there are seasonal fl uctuations of thrips abundance.

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Joseph. M. Kemble, Goeff W. Zehnder, W. Robert Goodman, Mahefatiana Andrianifahanana, Ellen M. Bauske, Edward J. Sikora and John F. Murphy

The Alabama Tomato Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program was demonstrated during two growing seasons in southeastern Alabama. The program consisted of a twice-a-week insect/disease scouting service combined with a weather-timed spray program (TOM-CAST). On average, growers made four fewer insecticide applications and three to four fewer fungicide applications when following the IPM program compared to their conventional, calendar-based program. There was no apparent reduction in yield when following the IPM program. An economic analysis indicated that growers following the IPM program saved an average of $54.36/acre ($134.32/ha).

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Nicolas Tremblay, Tarif Charbaji, Francois Fournier and Odile Carisse

General 1 Scouting and Research Network, South of Montreal Area. 2 Dept Plant Science, Macdonald College of McGill Univ.

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Amy Fulcher, Dava Hayden and Winston Dunwell

The objectives of Kentucky's Sustainable Nursery Production Practices Extension Program are for 1) the Kentucky nursery industry to continue sustained growth and 2) Kentucky growers to produce high quality plants, efficiently use pesticides, be stewards of their land and Kentucky's environment. Sustainable Nursery Program Components are 1) Integrated Pest Management (IPM): Nursery Scouting, Scout Training and Scouting Education for growers, Extension workers, and students; 2) Best Management Practice (BMP) Workshops: BMP VI: Disease Demolition Workshop; 3) Production Practice Demonstration: Pruning Training, Pesticide Handling, and Safety and Environmental Stewartship. 4.) Research: Pruning protocols; Media and media amendments; Precision Fertilization and Irrigation. The Kentucky Nursery Crops Scouting Program scouting guidelines were developed and contained: a weekly scouting/trapping guide; a listing of which pests to look for and on what host plants, and a detailed methodology of precisely how to look for the pest, its damage, and how to record this information such that comparisons could be made across nurseries and seasons.

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Charles A. Powell, Michael S. Burton, Robert Pelosi, Mark A. Ritenour and Robert C. Bullock

' recommendations. The experimental area was scouted for leafminers every week over a 5-year period. Each tree was examined and the total number of mines (interepidermal tunnels that are easily visible and incited by burrowing of single leafminer larvae) was

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Kent D. Kobayashi

-related apps for research, extension, teaching, and industry are widely available. These apps deal with a myriad of subjects including food safety ( Albrecht et al., 2012 ), geographic information systems, image enhancement, hydroponics, scouting for insects

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Leah L. Granke, Layla E. Crawford and Mary K. Hausbeck

and reapply fungicides frequently. Systemic fungicides such as azoxystrobin and myclobutanil provide better control than contact fungicides ( Hausbeck et al., 2003 , 2006 ). Although frequent scouting of the gerbera crop for early signs of powdery