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Sarah E. Lineberger and Jayne M. Zajicek

Nutrition in the Garden is a garden program designed to help teachers integrate nutrition education into their classroom using a hands-on tool, the garden. The objectives of this research project were to 1) develop a garden activity guide to help teachers integrate nutrition education, specifically as it relates to fruit and vegetables, into their curricula, 2) evaluate whether students developed more positive attitudes towards fruit and vegetables by participating in the garden program, and 3) evaluate whether students developed better nutritional behavior by eating more fruit and vegetables after participating in the garden program. Students' nutritional attitudes regarding fruit and vegetables were measured with a fruit and vegetable preference questionnaire divided into three sections targeting vegetables, fruit, and fruit and vegetable snacks. Students' nutritional behaviors regarding fruit and vegetables were evaluated through 24-hour recall journals. After gardening, students' attitudes towards vegetables became significantly more positive. In contrast, no differences were detected in attitudes towards fruit. Students also had more positive attitudes towards fruit and vegetable snacks after gardening, with female students and younger students having the greatest improvement in snack attitude scores. Even though school gardening improved students' attitudes towards vegetables, fruit and vegetable consumption of students did not significantly improve due to gardening. Overall, the average daily fruit and vegetable consumption of the students participating in the Nutrition in the Garden study was 2.0 servings per day. This falls short of the estimated national average for daily fruit and vegetable consumption for this age group (3.4 servings) and extremely short of the nationally recommended 5.0 servings per day.

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Summer Garden Programs Improve Youth Food Preferences Childhood and adolescent obesity is on the rise in the U.S. School lunch programs and after-school gardens are increasingly common ways to steer students towards healthier food choices. However

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Erin M. Silva and Geraldine Muller

. The challenge involves a menu planning and cooking contest for high school students highlighted by the inclusion of local produce into school lunch programs. The competition pairs teams of Vernon County high school students with local chefs to design

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Joseph Krahe and Benjamin Campbell

. 2015. < http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/4993/1/The_use_of_propensity_score_matching_in_the_evaluation_of_active_labour_market_policies.pdf > Campbell, B.L. Nayga, R.M. Silva, A. Park, J.L. 2011 Does the national school lunch program improve children’s dietary

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Amy L. McFarland, Benjamin J. Glover, Tina M. Waliczek and Jayne M. Zajicek

, and participation in the school lunch program. These schools did not have schoolyard habitats or use the SYHP in their science curriculum. The five treatment schools had teachers who used the SYHP curriculum and a habitat. The degree of participation

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Robert G. Nelson, Benjamin L. Campbell, Robert C. Ebel and William A. Dozier Jr.

,000 18-kg (net weight) boxes have been delivered. The goal is to provide every child participating in the Alabama school lunch program—≈743,000 students ( Alabama Department of Education, 2006 )—with one satsuma on one day. This has created a link between

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Bhimanagouda S. Patil, Kevin Crosby, David Byrne and Kendal Hirschi

the more narrowly targeted programs such as the School Lunch Program, nutrient intake typically increases (at least while the recipient remains in the program). For example, children in schools with restricted snack availability had significantly

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and net Ps, decreased. Bite-Sized Tomatoes: Cultivars and Quality for a Farm-to-School Lunch Program Warren Roberts 1 , Penny Perkins-Veazie 2 , Merritt Taylor 1 , and Jim Shrefler 1 , 1 Wes Watkins Agricultural Research and Extension Center