Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 78 items for :

  • "sanitizer" x
Clear All
Open access

Jaysankar De, Aswathy Sreedharan, You Li, Alan Gutierrez, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Steven A. Sargent and Keith R. Schneider

efficacy of FAC to that of hydrocooling with sanitizer and of hydrocooling without sanitizer to reduce Salmonella on inoculated blueberries and to assess the effects of these treatments on the shelf life and quality of fruit. Materials and methods Fruit

Free access

Jorge M. Fonseca, James W. Rushing and Robert F. Testin

Fresh-cut watermelon cubes stored at selected temperatures within the range of 1.1 to 14.5 °C had decreasing quality shelf life corresponding with increasing temperature. At lower temperatures there was a random occurrence of chilling injury symptoms in some cubes that was associated with the section of watermelon from which the cubes were cut. Cubes removed from the top side of the intact watermelon fruit were more susceptible to chilling injury than cubes from other sectors of the fruit. Sanitizing cubes with chlorine (40 ul/l) or ozone (0.04 μL/L) solutions caused an initial reduction in microbial count, but, during storage, the effect diminished and became insignificant compared to controls. Overall quality was lower in cubes receiving aqueous sanitizing treatments, possibly due to mechanical injury occurring during centrifugation to remove excess solution. Overall quality of cubes exposed to UV light (≈250 nm for 1 to 5 min) was better than cubes receiving aqueous sanitizing treatment. The effectiveness of UV treatment in reducing microbial load was dependent on the amount of cube surface exposed to the light. The results emphasize the importance of preventing microbial contamination during processing of fresh-cut watermelon.

Free access

Jorge M. Fonseca, James W. Rushing and Robert F. Testin

Fresh-cut watermelon cubes stored at selected temperatures within the range of 1.1 to 14.5 °C had decreasing quality shelf life corresponding with increasing temperature. At lower temperatures there was a random occurrence of chilling injury symptoms in some cubes that was associated with the section of watermelon from which the cubes were cut. Cubes removed from the top side of the intact watermelon fruit were more susceptible to chilling injury than cubes from other sectors of the fruit. Sanitizing cubes with chlorine (40 μL·L–1) or ozone (0.04 μL·L–1) solutions caused an initial reduction in microbial count but during storage the effect diminished and became insignificant compared to controls. Overall quality was lower in cubes receiving aqueous sanitizing treatments, possibly due to mechanical injury occurring during centrifugation to remove excess solution. Overall quality of cubes exposed to UV light (≈250 nm for 1–5 min) was better than cubes receiving aqueous sanitizing treatment. The effectiveness of UV treatment in reducing microbial load was dependent on the amount of cube surface exposed to the light. The results emphasize the importance of preventing microbial contamination during processing of fresh-cut watermelon.

Free access

William G. McGlynn and Siobhan Reilly

Watermelons were dipped in either 1000 ppm sodium hypochlorite solution or in deionized water, dried, then cut into chunks of ≈83 × 152 × 51 mm. These were sealed into plastic containers and stored at either 2, 4, or 8 °C. Samples were removed after 3, 7, and 10 days for microbial and quality tests. Chlorine dip reduced average aerobic plate counts by ≈3 log cycles and average coliform counts by nearly 2 log cycles. This may have significant implications for food safety and off-flavor development. The difference in microbial counts persisted for ≈7 days. No clear effect from storage temperature was seen. A trend for lower temperatures to preserve red hue was observed in objective color tests. Texture tests revealed a trend for all melons to become firmer during storage. No clear patterns with respect to storage temperature or sanitizing dip were seen.

Free access

Ji Gang Kim*, Yaguang Luo, Yang Tao and Kenneth C. Gross

The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP), sanitizer and their combination on ethylene action, microbial growth and storage life of fresh-cut cilantro were studied. Fresh cilantro was treated with 1.5 μL·L-1 MCP for 18 hours at 10 °C. The treated and nontreated cilantro leaves were cut and washed in water, chlorine, and mixed solution of sodium chlorite and citric acid (SANOVA). Samples were dried, packaged with 29.2μmol·kg-1 Pa s oxygen transmission rate films, and stored for 14 days at 5 °C. Results indicated that MCP affected respiration rate of fresh-cut cilantro and the headspace gas composition (O2 and CO2) of sample packages. The combined treatment had lower tissue electrolyte leakage and ethanol concentration, and delayed color changes during storage. SANOVA and the combination of MCP and SANOVA were effective in reducing aerobic microbial population and coliform population. Samples treated with MCP and SANOVA had good quality with high overall quality score at the end of storage.

Full access

R.G. Linderman and E.A. Davis

plants in a nursery, thus requiring some treatment of the soil to eradicate this regulated, quarantined pathogen. Growers currently attempt to decontaminate used containers by pressure washing or chemical sanitization. Many simply apply fungicides during

Full access

Annalisa Hultberg, Michele Schermann and Cindy Tong

. Areas identified for further education included increasing awareness of outbreaks associated with fresh produce, recordkeeping of manure applications, composting processes, irrigation water quality testing, and use of sanitizers in wash water. Cohen et

Free access

Joongmin Shin, Bruce Harte, Janice Harte and Kirk Dolan

before delivery to the consumer to reduce the microbial population. Various methods can be used to reduce microbial populations, including use of sanitizers and irradiation. Chlorine compounds are the most popular group of Food and Drug Administration

Free access

J.A. Narciso, E.A. Baldwin, A. Plotto and C.M. Ference

disinfectant/sanitizer is soon to be approved for the organic market and has been shown to be effective against postharvest decay when applied postharvest on mango and citrus ( Narciso, 2005 ; Narciso and Plotto, 2005 ). Materials and Methods

Full access

Rosa E. Raudales, Tracy A. Irani, Charles R. Hall and Paul R. Fisher

sodium hypochlorite, has decreased sanitizing activity as pH increases ( Lang et al., 2008 ; White, 1992 ). Chlorine dioxide is effective at a wider pH range than other chlorine forms ( Faust and Aly, 1983 ). Copper solubility also decreases with