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Rick D. Peters, Tharcisse Barasubiye and Joanne Driscoll

The rutabaga [ Brassica napus L. (Napobrassica group)], also known as the swede turnip, is a member of Brassicaceae, and in North America is predominantly grown in California, Colorado, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, as well as several Canadian

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Pilar Soengas, Maria Elena Cartea, Pablo Velasco, Guillermo Padilla and Amando Ordás

The species Brassica napus includes economically important vegetable and fodder crops, such as oilseed rape, rutabaga, and leaf rape. A B. napus crop called nabicol has been grown by farmers in northwestern Spain for many years, and is an

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V.I. Shattuck and B. Brolley

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R. Doucet, V.I. Shattuck and L.W. Stobbs

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Charles F. Forney and Michael A. Jordan

Methanethiol (MT) is a volatile compound responsible for the unpleasant odor evolved when fresh broccoli (Brassica oleracea L., Italica group) is held under anaerobic conditions. Inductive atmospheres can develop in storage, transportation containers, or modified atmosphere packages, resulting in reduced quality. To determine if related vegetables are capable of producing MT, 12 different vegetables from the genus Brassica were cut into ready-to-eat forms. Fifty-gram samples were sealed in 500-mL glass jars and flushed with N2. After 24 h in the dark at 20 °C, headspace samples from the jars were analyzed for MT and other volatiles. Headspace concentration of MT was greatest in broccoli florets, followed by pak choi (Brassica rapa L., Chinensis group) leaf blades, savoy cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group), broccoflower (Brassica oleracea L., Botrytis group), and green and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group). Broccoli stems, kale (Brassica oleracea L., Acephala group), Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L., Gemmifera group), pak choi petioles, rutabaga (Brassica napus L., Napobrassica group) root, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L., Botrytis group) florets, Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L., Pekinensis group), and kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea L., Gongylodes group) tubers produced <3% of the MT produced by broccoli florets. Green tissues appeared to have a greater capacity to produce MT than nongreen tissues. Anaerobic production of CO2 and ethanol did not relate to the vegetable's ability to produce MT. The production of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS) were also induced by the anaerobic conditions. Green cabbage produced the greatest concentration of DMDS, followed by savoy cabbage and broccoli florets. Production of DMTS was similar to the pattern observed for MT, but DMDS production was not highly correlated with MT production.

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Aaron Heinrich, Shinji Kawai and Jim Myers

evaluated included broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, napa cabbage, pak choi, kohlrabi, turnip, and rutabaga. For each crop, a clubroot susceptible cultivar was planted as a comparison. In 2015, five on-farm trials were initiated in fields

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Pablo Velasco, Pilar Soengas, Marta Vilar, Maria Elena Cartea and Mercedes del Rio

for seeds, rutabaga [ B. napus var. rapifera (Metzg) Sinskaya] grown for its enlarged swollen hypocotyls, and leaf rape [ B. napus var. pabularia (DC.) Rchb.] such as siberian kale or hanover salad, grown for leafy greens in northern Europe. Crops of

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Judith A. Abbott*

Demand for fresh fruits and vegetables is increasing worldwide in response to health concerns, wealth, and the desire for variety in the diet. However, consumption of produce is contingent on the ability of the industry to provide high quality fresh produce and on its convenience, as well as on consumer education and economics. Texture measurement is accepted by horticultural industries as a critical indicator of quality of fruits and vegetables. The fresh produce industry and, indirectly, consumers need methods for measuring produce texture to ensure the quality within a grade, and scientists need measurements to quantify the results of their treatments, whether treatments are genetic, chemical, or physical. The variety of attributes required to fully describe textural properties can only be fully measured by sensory evaluation by a panel of trained assessors. However, instrumental measurements are preferred over sensory evaluations for both commercial and research applications because instruments are more convenient, less expensive, and tend to provide consistent values when used by different people. Thus, instrumental measurements need to be developed that predict sensory evaluations of texture. Such instrumental measurements can then provide a common language among researchers, producers, packers, regulatory agencies, and customers. We compare sensory evaluations of specific critical textural attributes to instrumental force/deformation measurements on a wide variety of fruits and vegetables with relatively uniform bulk tissues, such as apples, bananas, carrots, jicama, melons, pears, potatoes, rutabagas, and several others.

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Pilar Soengas, Pablo Velasco, Guillermo Padilla, Amando Ordás and Maria Elena Cartea

Brassica napus includes economically important crops such as oilseed rape, rutabaga, and leaf rape. Other vegetable forms of Brassica napus, namely nabicol and couve-nabiça, are grown in northwestern Spain and north of Portugal, respectively, and their leaves are used for human consumption and fodder. The relationship of nabicol with other Brassica napus leafy crops was studied before, but its origin remained unclear. The aims of this work were to study the genetic relationships among nabicol landraces and other B. napus crops based on microsatellites and to relate the genotypic differences with the use of the crop. The relationship among 35 Brassica napus populations representing different crops was studied based on 16 microsatellite markers. An analysis of molecular variance was performed partitioning the total variance into three components. The source of variation resulting from groups was defined considering the main use of the crop and accounted for a smaller percentage of variation than other sources of variation, proving that this division is not real. Populations clustered into seven different clusters using a similarity coefficient of 0.82. No clear association was evident between clusters and the main use of populations, suggesting genetic differences among populations could reflect differences in their origin/breeding or domestication. Spanish nabicol could have originated from a sample of couve-nabiças, and couve-nabiças could be used to improve nabicol landraces, because they have a narrow genetic basis that limits their potential for breeding.

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Charles F. Forney and Michael A. Jordan

Methanethiol (MT) is a volatile compound responsible for the strong off-odor that is evolved when fresh broccoli is held under anaerobic atmospheres. Inductive atmospheres can develop in modified-atmosphere packages, resulting in reduced quality. To determine if related vegetables are capable of producing MT, 12 different vegetables from the genus Brassica were cut into ready-to-eat forms. Fifty-gram samples of these cut vegetables were sealed in 500-ml glass jars and flushed with N2. After flushing, jars were held for 24 h at 20C in the dark. Headspace samples from the jars then were analyzed for MT and other volatiles using a GC-MS> The concentration of MT was greatest in jars containing broccoli florets. Broccoli flower buds removed from florets produced 40 times more MT than peduncle and stem tissues (38.3 vs. 0.87 mmol·m–3). Headspace concentration of MT (mmol·m–3) in jars containing these different vegetables was: broccoli florets, 22.7; pak choi leaf blades, 17.8; savoy cabbage, 12.4; broccoflower, 7.5; green storage cabbage, 5.2; red cabbage, 2.7; kale, 0.81; Brussels sprouts, 0.36; pak choi petioles, 0.28; rutabaga root, 0.26; cauliflower florets, 0.18; Chinese cabbage, 0.03; and kohlrabi tubers, 0.02. In addition to MT, ethanol, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide were detected in the headspace over each of the 12 vegetables. The contribution of these induced compounds to off-odor development in packaged, precut vegetables will be discussed.