Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 184 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Nader Soltani, J. LaMar Anderson and Alvin R. Hamson

`Crimson Sweet' watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] plants were grown with various mulches and rowcovers and analyzed for relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf area index (LAI), and crop growth rate (CGR). Spunbonded polyester fabric (SB-PF) and perforated polyethylene film (PCP) rowcovers generally showed greater mean RGR, SLA and CGR than spunbonded polypropylene polyamide net (SB-PP), black plus clear combination plastic mulch and black plastic mulch alone. Plants on mulches and under rowcovers showed significant increases in RGR, NAR, and SLA over plants grown in bare soil. Carbon dioxide concentration inside the transplanting mulch holes was nearly twice the ambient CO, concentration. Growth analysis of sampled watermelon plants during early stages of development under various treatments was predictive of crop yield. Plants under SB-PF and PCP rowcovers produced the earliest fruit and the greatest total yield. An asymmetrical curvilinear model for watermelon growth and development based on cardinal temperatures was developed. The model uses hourly averaged temperatures to predict growth and phenological development of `Crimson Sweet' watermelon plants grown with and without rowcovers. Early vegetative growth correlated well with accumulated heat units. Results indicate a consistent heat unit requirement for the `Crimson Sweet' watermelon plants to reach first male flower, first female flower and first harvest in uncovered plants and plants under rowcovers. Greater variability was observed in predicting date of first harvest than first bloom.

Free access

Clifton A. Martin and Rebecca Grube Sideman

England, but the extent of protection required is unknown. The use of high or low tunnels covered with plastics, spunbonded, or woven rowcovers, or a combination thereof, are known to moderate harsh winter climates without supplemental heating (C.A. Martin

Free access

Ajay Nair and Mathieu Ngouajio

diseases. The role of rowcovers as an effective pest management tool has been increasing because they serve as a barrier against various insect pests, including aphids, cucumber beetles, whiteflies, and pathogens these insects transmit ( Bextine and

Full access

Ramón A. Arancibia and Carl E. Motsenbocker

fit better today's smaller households. Several reports have shown that watermelon growth and yield increase in response to plastic mulch and rowcover, but the effect on fruit size distribution has been overlooked ( Baker et al., 1998 ; Marr et al

Full access

Rebecca Grube Sideman, Amanda Brown, Ruth Hazzard and Heather Bryant

–2013. Low tunnels made of 10-ft polyvinyl chloride conduit or bent electrical metallic tubing bows were installed over the plants in late fall. The resulting 3.5–ft tall low tunnels were covered with 1.25 oz/yard 2 rowcover (Dupont 5131; Autoverters

Free access

Jennifer Tillman, Ajay Nair, Mark Gleason and Jean Batzer

-disturbance alternatives such as strip tillage, especially in warm-season crops like cucurbits. One way to overcome the possible yield loss in a rolled cover crop system is to use rowcovers. Rowcovers can increase air temperature and soil temperature ( Ibarra et al., 2001

Full access

Timothy Coolong and Mark A. Williams

overwintered in Kentucky. Observations suggest the use of plastic mulches and rowcovers may enhance the winter survival of field-grown onions in Kentucky. Although the use of black-polyethylene mulch has been reported to increase yield in overwintered onions in

Full access

Jennifer Tillman, Ajay Nair, Mark Gleason and Jean Batzer

planting may also be delayed since cereal rye must reach anthesis to be effectively ended by a roller crimper ( Mirsky et al., 2009 ). Nevertheless, rolled cover crops are becoming an increasingly popular strategy in reduced tillage operations. Rowcovers

Free access

Djamila Rekika, Katrine A. Stewart, Guy Boivin and Sylvie Jenni

strategies to replace or reduce pesticide use. Agrotextile floating rowcovers are already being used successfully to manage insect pests and the viruses they transmit to vegetable crops such as radish ( Rekika et al., 2008 ; Wells and Loy, 1985

Full access

Elsa S. Sánchez, Ermita Hernández, Mark L. Gleason, Jean C. Batzer, Mark A. Williams, Timothy Coolong and Ricardo Bessin

polypropylene rowcovers exclude cucumber beetles and other insect pests ( Bextine et al., 2001 ; Perring et al., 1989 ; Saalau Rojas et al., 2011 ), thereby eliminating the need for insecticide applications during the protected period. Rowcovers are often used