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Maryse L. Leblanc, Daniel C. Cloutier and Katrine A. Stewart

A 2-year study was conducted to assess sweet corn (Zea mays) susceptibility to mechanical weeding using a rotary hoe at preemergence to six-leaf stages of corn development and at different combinations of stages. Three sweet corn cultivars: early (`Quickie'), mid (`July Gem'), and late season (`Sensor') were seeded at two sowing dates. The experiment was conducted in a weed-free environment. In general, sweet corn could be cultivated with the rotary hoe at least once without yield reduction from preemergence to the six-leaf stage. Cob numbers were reduced and maturity delayed after three or four cultivations with the rotary hoe. The rotary hoe could be an effective tool in controlling weeds in an integrated weed management approach or for organic sweet corn production since it cultivates both within and between the rows. The rotary hoe, which covers a large area in a short time, can be used at later growth stages, extending the time period during which it can be used without damaging the crop and reducing yield.

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Changying Li, Pengcheng Yu, Fumiomi Takeda and Gerard Krewer

software of the instrumented sphere sensing system; its application in evaluating a rotary and a slapper harvester design; and how the impact data collected could be translated into fruit bruising rates for two SH blueberries (‘Scintilla’ and FL 05

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Michel Pirchio, Marco Fontanelli, Christian Frasconi, Luisa Martelloni, Michele Raffaelli, Andrea Peruzzi, Lisa Caturegli, Monica Gaetani, Simone Magni, Marco Volterrani and Nicola Grossi

et al., 2002a , 2002b ; Whereley et al., 2011 ). Typically, turfgrass mowers are divided into three main groups: rotary mowers, reel mowers, and flail mowers. Rotary mowers cut the grass by hitting it with a revolving single blade and are most

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Dilma Silva, Donald Cox and Richard C. Beeson Jr

evaluate the yield of the rotary root separator. Results and Discussion Mechanical isolation of roots, followed by handpicking of each rhizotron's substrate (160 L), was completed in averaged 4 man-hours ( Table 2 ). This is four times faster than the

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Charles C. Reilly, Michael W. Hotchkiss and Kathryn C. Taylor

Pesticide application in peach (Prunus persica) orchards with a commercial airblast sprayer was compared to that of an air assisted rotary atomizer (AARA), low-volume sprayer during the 2000 through 2003 seasons. The two technologies were employed during early season petal fall applications, shuck split applications and standard cover sprays using phosmet, sulfur, propiconazole, chlorothalonil, azoxystrobin and captan. Ripe fruit, picked 1 day prior to first harvest each season were rated for peach scab (Cladosporium carpophilum), brown rot (Monilinia fructicola), insect (Hemipteran) damage (cat facing), and blemishes. Differences in brown rot, insect damage, and blemish ratings were not detected between the treatments for each of the four seasons. Differences were detected during the 2000 and 2001 seasons for peach scab, with the AARA sprayer plots having a higher incidence. Spray coverage was quantitatively evaluated with Rhodamine B dye by leaf rinses that indicated there was equivalent coverage for each application method. Phosmet residue detection on trees of the treated rows was also equivalent from each method. Phosmet off-target spray movement (drift) was reduced 59% one row away from the treated row and 93% in the fifth row from the treated row by the AARA sprayer compared to airblast sprayer drift.

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Nicola Grossi, Marco Fontanelli, Elisa Garramone, Andrea Peruzzi, Michele Raffaelli, Michel Pirchio, Luisa Martelloni, Christian Frasconi, Lisa Caturegli, Monica Gaetani, Simone Magni, J. Scott McElroy and Marco Volterrani

residential and nonresidential landscapes are mown with rotary-type mowers. Depending on the kind of power supply, ornamental lawn mowers, or simply “lawn mowers,” can be divided in two broad categories: electric mowers and combustion engine mowers. Electric

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John J. McCue, James R. Schupp and Highmoor Farm

The growth and fruiting of 10-year-old `Mcintosh'/M.7 apple trees were compared under the following weed management systems: 1)untreated control; 2) herbicide spray (paraquat + oryzalin); 3) rotary tilling applied in May, June and July; 4) rotary tilling plus herbicide (oryzalin); 5) rotary tilling plus oats sown in August. All weed control methods increased tree growth compared to the untreated control over three years. Yield and fruit size were increased by the herbicide and the rotary tilled treatment. Rotary tilling plus herbicide increased yield but fruit size was larger than controls in 1990 only. Rotary tilling plus oats produced yield and fruit size equivalent to the control. In 1989 and 1990 rotary tilling alone provided less weed control compared to the herbicide treatment, while in July 1991, the reverse was true. Rotary tilling with herbicide and with oats have demonstrated weed control comparable to or better than the herbicide treatment except for the rotary tilled plus oats treatment in 1990. There were no differences among treatments in fruit color, maturity and percent soluble solids.

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Masoume Amirkhani, Anil N. Netravali, Wencheng Huang and Alan G. Taylor

) and adjusted to pH 10 to help solubilize the proteins in the soy flour. The binder liquid was prepared and used on the same day. Seed coating (encrustment) method A laboratory-scale rotary pan coater, R-6 (Universal Coating Systems, Independence, OR

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Filippo Rimi, Stefano Macolino, Bernd Leinauer and Umberto Ziliotto

cut of 52 mm using a rotary mower (HRD 536; Honda Europe Power Equipment, Ormes, France) with an effective mowing width of 55 cm and clippings were removed. The mowing height was chosen because it is the height at which bermudagrass in low maintenance

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Robert D. Hagenmaier and Robert A. Baker

The shrinkage rate of `Marsh' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), `Ambersweet' hybrid [(C. reticulata Blanco × C. paradisi Macf. × C. reticulata) × C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] and `Valencia' oranges [C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] was increased 50 % to 150% by washing the fruit with rotary brushes, but was not changed by hand-washing the fruit with cellulose sponges. Internal CO2 increased using both washing methods. Waxed fruit obtained from five Florida packinghouses and cleaned with rotary brushes and waxed had shrinkage rates the same as those of nonwashed controls. Thus, controlling the washing process is important to minimize shrinkage of fresh citrus fruit.