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Luis Alonso Valdez-Aguilar and David William Reed

Response to alkalinity was evaluated in two hibiscus cultivars, Bimini Breeze and Carolina Breeze, grown in a soilless growing medium and in hydroponic culture. For soilless growing medium, plants were potted in a sphagnum peat–perlite-based substrate and irrigated with solutions containing 0 to 10 mm NaHCO3 for 12 weeks. In hydroponic culture, bare-rooted plants were transferred to a 9-L tray containing a Hoagland's nutrient solution prepared with NaHCO3 at the concentrations previously indicated. In soilless growing medium, shoot dry weight was minimally affected by NaHCO3 concentration for `Bimini Breeze', but `Carolina Breeze' exhibited a significant decrease in shoot mass with increasing NaHCO3 concentration. In hydroponic culture, increasing concentration of NaHCO3 induced a decrease in shoot and root mass in both cultivars, but root mass decrease was more pronounced in `Bimini Breeze'. In soilless growing medium, increasing the concentration of NaHCO3 caused an increase in growing medium pH. The pH increase was less pronounced for `Bimini Breeze' than for `Carolina Breeze', indicating a higher capacity for root zone acidification by `Bimini Breeze'. Newly developed leaves of both cultivars showed increasing chlorosis with increasing NaHCO3 concentration. However, `Bimini Breeze' was more tolerant because, according to regression models, 5.7 mm NaHCO3 would be required to reduce chlorophyll levels by 10%, compared with 2.2 mm for `Carolina Breeze', when grown in soilless medium. Fe reductase activity decreased when `Carolina Breeze' plants were grown in 5 mm NaHCO3. However, in `Bimini Breeze', Fe reductase activity was enhanced. These observations indicate that the increased tolerance of `Bimini Breeze' to increasing alkalinity is the result of enhanced Fe reductase activity and increased acidification of the root zone.

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Lauren M. Garcia Chance, Joseph P. Albano, Cindy M. Lee, Staci M. Wolfe, and Sarah A. White

process by which irises induce root zone acidification and the effects of hydraulic retention time and flow rate on pH change. pH effect on plant-aided nutrient remediation . Total ionic N (TN = NH 4 + + NO 2 − + NO 3 − ) and P material balance and load

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Ryan W. Dickson, Paul R. Fisher, and William R. Argo

are iron-efficiency strategies. Albano and Miller (1996) also found that under iron-sufficient and excess conditions, root zone acidification and increased iron reductase activity was not expressed. Floriculture species that have been noted to