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Dana Jokela and Ajay Nair

producers, however, typically end cover crops mechanically—using a tool such as a roller-crimper or flail mower—and have few options for chemical control of weeds that come up through the cover crop mulch. Weed management through rolled cover crops has long

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Ted S. Kornecki, Francisco J. Arriaga and Andrew J. Price

two-stage roller crimper at 6.4 km·h −1 (68.8%). However, this termination rate was not significantly different from those from the straight bar roller at 3.2 and 6.4 km·h −1 or the smooth roller with crimper at 6.4 km·h −1 . Termination rates were

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Matthew J. Leavitt, Craig C. Sheaffer, Donald L. Wyse and Deborah L. Allan

with black plastic were superior to those with hairy vetch. The many mechanical methods explored for killing cover crops in no-tillage, high-residue systems have been well reviewed ( Creamer and Dabney, 2002 ). Roller–crimpers, used extensively in Latin

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Francesco Montemurro, Angelo Fiore, Gabriele Campanelli, Fabio Tittarelli, Luigi Ledda and Stefano Canali

biomass and the control of weeds Eur. J. Agron. 26 21 29 Kornecki, T.S. Price, A.J. Raper, R.L. Arriaga, F.J. 2009 New roller crimper concepts for mechanical termination of cover crops in conservation agriculture Renew. Agr. Food Syst. 24 165 173 Korsaeth

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Ted S. Kornecki and Francisco J. Arriaga

is under no-till production ( CTIC, 2004 ). A limiting factor is the lack of equipment (rollers/crimpers) needed to manage tall cover crops such as cereal winter rye ( Secale cereale L.) and winter crimson clover ( Trifolium incarnatum L.) in flat

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Jennifer Tillman, Ajay Nair, Mark Gleason and Jean Batzer

with conventional tillage ( Bottenberg et al., 1997 ; Hoyt et al., 1994 ). One method of reduced tillage involves seeding a cover crop in the fall, most commonly cereal rye, and allowing it to reach anthesis in the spring. A roller crimper is then used

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Jennifer Tillman, Ajay Nair, Mark Gleason and Jean Batzer

soil vulnerable to erosion ( Dickey et al., 1983 ) among its other potential negative consequences described earlier. One way to end cover crops without tillage is to use a roller crimper, which is a tractor-mounted implement with a water-filled rolling

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David M. Butler, Gary E. Bates and Sarah E. Eichler Inwood

frameworks, cover crops in these systems are typically ended mechanically (e.g., roller-crimper or similar equipment) at later stages of physiological maturity ( Ashford and Reeves, 2003 ; Creamer and Dabney, 2002 ; Mirsky et al., 2009 ; Reberg-Horton et

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Jeffrey R. Pieper, Rebecca Nelson Brown and José A. Amador

and 2012. The rye was killed at anthesis with a front-mounted roller-crimper (I & J Manufacturing, Gap, PA). Planting strips (30-cm-wide) were cut in a killed rye cover crop with a custom-built zone tillage unit consisting of a Monroe Tufline ™ 2S-24

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Jason M. Lilley and Elsa S. Sánchez

of the rye was accomplished with a single pass with a front-mounted 3-m-wide roller crimper as described by Mischler et al. (2010) at early anthesis (20 May 2013 and 28 May 2014). The hairy vetch was treated with two passes with the roller crimper