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Eunkyung Lee, Steven A. Sargent and Donald J. Huber

the effects of physical impacts and ripeness stage on selected quality parameters of Roma-type tomato. Materials and Methods Plant materials. Roma tomatoes (‘BHN 467’) were hand-harvested at mature-green color stage near Immokalee, FL

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Sharon Dea, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Maria Cecilia do Nascimento Nunes and Elizabeth A. Baldwin

Maximum shelf life and best eating quality are extremely important attributes for successful commercialization of fresh-cut fruits, but both are greatly influenced by the initial ripeness stage of the fruit as well as by the cutting procedures

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Steven A. Sargent, Jeffrey K. Brecht and Judith J. Zoellner

Internal bruising (IB) caused by handling impacts results in disruption of normal ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) locular gel. It was selected as an injury indicator to investigate the effect of drop height (O, 10, 20, 30 cm) onto an unpadded surface and number of impacts (one or two) for three tomato cultivars. For mature-green (MG) tomatoes, significant incidence of IB (5% to 45%) was found in all cultivars for single drops on opposite sides of fruits from 20 cm; two drops on the same location from 20 cm caused 20% to 30% IB. Breaker-stage (BR) tomatoes were more sensitive to impacts than MG. Single drops from 10 cm on opposite sides of BR fruits caused 15% to 73% IB, depending on cultivar. Two drops on a single location from 10 cm caused 50% to 68% IB. `Sunny' was less susceptible to IB than `Solar Set' or `Cobia' (formerly NVH-4459).

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Muharrem Ergun, Steven A. Sargent and Donald J. Huber

Grape tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Santa') harvested at light-red (>90% color) and full-red stages were treated with 1 μL·L–1 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) for 24 hours at 20 °C and stored at 20 °C. After 1 day of storage, fruit harvested at light-red stage treated with 1-MCP had a 56% lower respiration rate than untreated fruit. By day 7, respiration rates of the two treatments had converged at about 2 mL·kg–1·h–1. Ethylene production of light-red stage tomatoes treated with 1-MPC was 24% lower than untreated during storage, with rates converging by day 11. For fruit harvested full-red, 1-MCP had similar effects on respiration and ethylene production, although convergence occurred earlier, by day 5. Subsequent tests were conducted only with fruit harvested at full-red stage, since fruit harvested at the light-red stage had lower soluble solids content (4.3%) than fruit harvested at the full-red stage (5.5%). Several combinations of 1-MCP concentrations and exposure times were applied at 20 °C: 1 μL·L–1 for 24 h, 5 μL·L–1 for 6 or 12 h, 25 μL·L–1 for 6 or 12 h, and 50 μL·L–1 for 6 or 12 h; following the respective pretreatment fruits were stored at 20 °C. 1-MCP pretreatment extended marketable life by 1 d, irrespective of pretreatment regime, where untreated and pretreated fruit remained marketable (<15% of fruit soft, decayed and/or shriveled) for 6 and 7 d, respectively. However, 1-MCP did not affect whole fruit firmness, epidermal color, internal color, soluble solids content (6.5%), total titratable acidity (0.64%), or pH (4.3). In a third test simulating commercial handling procedures, full-red harvested tomatoes were treated with 1 μL·L–1 1-MCP for 24 h at either 13 or 20 °C, stored for 4 d at 13 °C, and then transferred to 20 °C. Under these conditions, marketable life for untreated and 1-MCP-treated tomatoes was 7 and 8 d, respectively.

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Muharrem Ergun, Jiwon Jeong, Donald J. Huber and Daniel J. Cantliffe

`Galia' (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus L. Naud. `Galia') melons exhibit relatively short postharvest longevity, limited in large part by the rapid softening of this high quality melon. The present study was performed to characterize the physiological responses of `Galia' fruit harvested at green (preripe) and yellow (advanced ripening) stages and treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) before storage at 20 °C. Treatment with 1.5 μL·L-1 1-MCP before storage delayed the climacteric peaks of respiration and ethylene production of green fruit by 11 and 6 d, respectively, and also significantly suppressed respiration and ethylene production maxima. Softening of both green and yellow fruit was significantly delayed by 1-MCP. During the first 5 d at 20 °C, the firmness of green control fruit declined 66% while 1-MCP-treated fruit declined 46%. By day 11, firmness of control and 1-MCP-treated green fruit had declined about 90% and 75%, respectively. The firmness of control yellow fruit stored at 20 °C declined 70% within 5 d while 1-MCP-treated fruit declined 30%. The 1-MCP-induced firmness retention was accompanied by significant suppression of electrolyte leakage of mesocarp tissue, providing evidence that membrane dysfunction might contribute to softening of `Galia' melons. The mesocarp of fruit harvested green and treated with 1-MCP eventually ripened to acceptable quality; however, under the treatment conditions (1.5 μL·L-1 1-MCP, 24 h) used in this study, irreversible suppression of surface color development was noted. The disparity in ripening recovery between mesocarp versus epidermal tissue was considerably less evident for fruit harvested and treated with 1-MCP at an advanced stage of development. The commercial use of 1-MCP with `Galia'-type melons should prove of immense benefit in long-term storage and/or export situations, and allow for retention of quality and handling tolerance for fruit harvested at more advanced stages of ripening.

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Chae Shin Lim, Seong Mo Kang, Jeoung Lai Cho and Kenneth C. Gross

different ripeness stages. This experiment was conducted to determine the role of carotenoids and antioxidation-related enzymes in CI development of pepper fruit using two cultivars, chilling-sensitive Nockgwang and chilling-tolerant Buchon, as affected by

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Angela D. Myracle, Zakkary J. Castonguay, Amber Elwell and Renae E. Moran

this research were to determine if the partially ripe stage of maturity is as acceptable as the tree-ripe stage of maturity in several asian plum cultivars and to determine the consumer acceptability of three plum types that possess cold hardiness in U

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Chae Shin Lim, Seong Mo Kang, Jeoung Lai Cho, Kenneth C. Gross and Allan B. Woolf

between the ripeness stage (especially between mature green and breaker stage) of bell pepper and chilling sensitivity, and no one has conducted anatomical studies of chilling symptoms at different ripeness stages. Thus, the objective of this study was to

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Adrian D. Berry, Steven A. Sargent, Marcio Eduardo Canto Pereira and Donald J. Huber

.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) avocado grade standards that limit appearance defects to 10% of the fruit surface ( USDA, 1957 ). Percent marketable fruit were calculated from the number of fruit that softened to full-ripe stage (≤15 N) with a Jenkins

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Angelos I. Deltsidis, Charles A. Sims and Jeffrey K. Brecht

firmness, with less focus on flavor and texture qualities ( Tieman et al., 2017 ). Also, a few studies have shown that the common practice of harvesting tomato fruit before ripening initiation and at early ripeness stages negatively affects the sensory